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Tips for Getting Ready for Cycling Season

Tips for Getting Your Body Ready for Cycling Season

Prepare Head to Toe for Cycling Season

Jen Charrette Climbing the Stelvio in Italy

Cycling season is upon us and it’s time to get energized and think about new approaches to your health and well-being— to change, to grow, to challenge yourself.

With that in mind, here are some tips on getting your body ready from head-to-toe.

Head

First set some goals for your cycling. Goals help you maintain motivation, especially one that’s within reach. Maybe you want to do your first triathlon or commit to a new PR. Reach out to friends or cycling groups to ride or train together. Need inspiration? The Cyclist’s Bucket List by Ian Dille has ideas for you. Or search online for websites related to cycling.

Back and Core

Your bike set-up is important to keep your back healthy, but an incorrect bike fit isn’t likely to be the only factor in lower back pain.

What is? Well, muscle fatigue may play a role. The back and abdomen are the weakest link for the majority of cyclists. Cyclists have strong leg muscles but don’t have the core and back strength to support their leg power. If the core is weak you lose power to the pedals.

To strengthen your core and back you’ll need to do some work off the bike. The best thing you can do is stretch. The CoreStretch was originally developed for Physical Therapists to help patients achieve a lower back stretch by using the body’s natural traction. It’s now available for personal use and eliminates the guess work while stretching.

Sensitive Areas

You would think that the evolving technology in cycling shorts would eliminate the need for a protection barrier to prevent saddle sores. Unfortunately, this is not the case in many situations, such as: long rides, indoor training, where you’re on the saddle a lot; and after being off the bike for an extended period. In these cases, you need a barrier. One option is chamois cream but these are messy and also don’t last long. Using a barrier roll-on, like ButtShield, provides a non-messy application that is waterproof and lasts your entire workout. It also contains anti-bacterial and anti-fungal ingredients to help reduce the likelihood of skin infections.

Don’t forget that basic hygiene helps too, like getting out of your shorts and into the shower as soon as possible.

Legs and Feet

There’s no way around it; if you spend long hours on your bike, parts of your body are going to end up hurting. This is especially true for your legs and feet which are doing most of the work. Together all of the following muscles contract in sequence, allowing you to pedal:

  • Quadriceps
  • Hamstrings
  • Calves
  • Hip flexors
  • Glutes
  • Plantar flexors
  • Dorsiflexors

Want to help those muscles work together? Focus on building off-the-bike leg strength, stretch after your ride, and get deep muscle massages frequently. An affordable way to get a the impact of  massage is with a tool like the RangeRoller. This is a do-it-yourself massager that prevents injuries, aids in recovery, and increases blood flow. I use mine in the evenings for a few minutes while watching TV.

And lastly, what about your feet? We tend to forget about our feet until they fail and start to cause us pain. But there may be some simple preventative solutions to keep them healthy and increase your cycling power.  First, invest in a trusted cycling shoe that fits. A good shoe will effectively transfer power to your pedals and keep your feet comfortable and supported. To keep your feet pain free and dry, use a blister prevention product like BlisterShield in your socks. I find BlisterShield especially useful in damp or hot conditions to prevent foot sores.

Following these simple but effective head to toe steps will get your body in shape now and keep you pedaling all summer long.


Jen Charrette is an avid road cyclist and mountain biker. She travels full time with her husband Randy, 2 sons, and 8 bikes. They chase summer while homeschooling and working remotely. You can find them online @pedaladventures or www.pedaladventures.com


You may also like:

Prevent Cycling Saddle Sores from Ruining Your Ride

Fighting Fatigue During Extended Cycling Rides

 

The Benefits of Stretching before a Workout

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE EXERCISING

by Joe Humphries

It’s difficult to argue against the benefits of exercise; several studies have shown a correlation between exercise and life expectancy. According to a cancer.gov article, those who are physically active often live 3.4 years longer than those who lead a sedentary lifestyle. That being said, there are a few key principles that you should become familiar with before embarking on your fitness journey. The things that we do leading up to, and after, the gym will dictate how much we benefit from exercise. Good nutrition is essential if you plan on getting through a strenuous workout; so, fuel your body with healthy and nutritious meals. Also, be sure to stretch before you begin your workouts. Why is stretching so important? Well, there are a number of benefits; this is the perfect time to not only warm up your muscles but to also improve your range of motion. Taking a few minutes to warm up will allow you to get the most out of exercise and can help prevent injury.

two runners stretching

THE IMPORTANCE OF STRETCHING

What does stretching entail, exactly? Stretching involves mobilizing your joints. During this process, muscle temperature increases and the body’s nervous system becomes fully engaged. To better contextualize this statement, imagine starting up a car on a very cold day; you would want to make sure that your vehicle is primed and ready to go before embarking on your journey.

HOW STRETCHING HELPS WITH LACTIC ACID

Of course, stretching doesn’t stop simply because you’ve started a few working sets; to maximize your workout, you will want to stretch in between sets and after your workout. This form of stretching is referred to as “static stretching.” The name is derived from the stretching style, whereby you stretch and hold that particular position for a few seconds. Static stretching is great for reducing lactic acid build-up; if you’re unfamiliar with this term, lactic acid is that burning sensation that you feel after fatiguing a particular muscle. This burning sensation can be attributed to a build-up of lactic acid in the muscle, by stretching and holding that stretched position (usually 10-30 seconds) the lactic acid will begin to dissipate. Lastly, a post-workout stretch is great as the body cools down; stretching after a workout improves flexibility and reduces cramping.

THE BEST WAY TO STRETCH

Honestly, there is no one way to stretch; the key is to stretch properly, which could mean incorporating dynamic, passive, or active stretching into your workouts. So, let’s break these concepts down:

Dynamic stretching– this is where you move your body through a series of challenging movements, which will, in turn, increase your range of motion.

Passive stretching– this is where you incorporate equipment like ProStretch Plus, as well as body weight exercises, into your routine.

Active stretching– this is where you contract one muscle while allowing the other muscle to relax.

ProStretch Plus

GETTING STARTED

Although these concepts may sound challenging, they ensure that you get the absolute best out of your workouts. Whether you’re trying to lose weight, build muscle, or simply looking to get toned, stretching exercises are critical to your success. So, if you’re not already stretching before, during, and after your workouts, hopefully, this article has encouraged you to start.

 

Joe Humphries is a contributing writer and media specialist for Orangetheory Fitness. He regularly writes for health and fitness blogs with an emphasis on high intensity interval training.

https://www.orangetheoryfitness.com/


 

You may also like:

For additional stretching tips, read Getting a Safe and Effective Tight Calf Stretch.

For tips on how to avoid injury, read Scariest Word for Runners: Injury.

Top Fitness Trends for 2018

Top Fitness Trends for 2018

(No gym membership required!)

Every New Year millions of us set health and fitness resolutions to eat healthier, exercise more, lose weight or gain muscle. Compared to December, gym attendance in the month of January increases by 50%. That means that you and your closest 500 newly-fit friends will be hitting the local gym at the same time. If you’re interested in a gym, the Better Business Bureau has a comprehensive list of tips for choosing a membership. But what if the best way to reach your fitness goals was found outside of those sweat-soaked gym walls? We’ve gathered top fitness trends for 2018 that will get you off the treadmill and into a challenging, but rewarding, fit routine.

*Disclaimer: Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise routines. Safety first!

Young woman running in mountains

  1. Trail & Ultra Running –

Combining two of the most popular forms of exercise, running and hiking, trail running has grown in popularity over the years. New runners enjoy the low initial investment of a pair of running shoes and seasoned runners seek new scenery and a new challenge. The dirt ground offers a reprieve from the pounding pavement on joints, while the uneven footing and varying terrain challenges mental focus and physical ability. One missed step could be costly. Trail running has also been listed as the Sixth Most Popular Extreme Sport, behind skating, skateboarding, paintball, climbing and snowboarding.

Beginners should start slowly at a brisk, but safe, pace to gain strength, endurance and stamina, and then slowly add speed and mileage to their runs. Also, follow basic safety tips: Tell someone where you will be running, bring your cell phone, know your trail routes and pack a few safety essentials with you. Here are some tips to stay injury-free as you begin trail running.

Running safely is key to enjoying the sport again and again. Any uncomfortable experiences will lower the chance of success. Chafe and blisters are common occurrences when trail running. 2Toms® SportShield® anti-chafe and BlisterShield® blister prevention offer travel-sized options that fit easily into a running pack or shorts pocket. They are easy to apply and will protect you throughout your run, no matter if it’s 2 miles or 100 miles. You will have a chafe and blister-free run!

Trail and Ultra Running Magazine put both products to the test on grueling trail runs. Read about their experiences with SportShield and BlisterShield.

  1. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) –

While it may not be the newest fitness trend, it is still one of the most popular; High intensity interval training is a type of training that pushes you to your max effort during a quick burst of exercise, followed by a short recovery period. You repeat the process many times for a full workout. This type of work out quickly raises and maintains a high heart rate leading to a fast caloric burn and metabolism boost. The Daily Burn has a list of benefits of HIIT training and a sample workout.

This type of work out could be done at home with no exercise equipment or you could increase the challenge by joining a group of HIIT fanatics. Groups like Camp Gladiator and CrossFit have created a close-knit community that meet at public parks or a “Box” (a CrossFit-specific gym) to work out in a team environment for added motivation and accountability. You might do exercises like tire flips, rope climbs, speed drills and weight lifting. Each person goes at their own pace and there is a certified trainer leading the exercises, so it is welcoming to newbies and fitness veterans alike.

HIIT workouts can put strain on your body, especially if you’re new to this type of exercise. Tools that can help you to better compete are 2Toms GripShield® grip enhancer for hands and Cho-Pat® Dual Action Knee Strap to support your knees during the multiple jumps, lunges and squats. This guide will help you pinpoint and treat common knee pain.

  1. Low Impact Exercise –

If the thought of burpees and chin-ups make you cringe, you might enjoy Low Impact Exercise. Low Impact Exercises include cycling/spin, walking/hiking, swimming or any of the 21 workouts listed here. While you may not be grunting and groaning your way through your workout, you will still be gaining the same benefits of increased heart rate, resistance training, and calorie burn. These types of exercise are great for someone new to exercise, suffering from joint pain, recovering from injury or illness or an athlete needing an active recovery day from an intense training schedule. In any case, low impact exercise is a win-win for anyone who adds it to their fitness routine.

Even low-impact exercise comes with its uncomfortable moments from time-to-time. Preventing these issues is crucial. Using an anti-chafe, such as 2Toms ButtShield®, that is safe for sensitive areas, will protect you from saddle sores and chafe. Here are Four Ways for Cyclists to Use ButtShield to Prevent Chafing While Cycling.

Also, maintaining flexibility as you increase duration or intensity of your exercise will go a long way in preventing sore muscles and future injuries. The CoreStretch® is a stretching device for your back and posterior muscles and ligaments. It will increase muscle flexibility in your hamstrings, lower back, upper back, hips and glutes. Here is more information about stretching for injury prevention.

Spartan Race Participant

Spartan Race

  1. OCR (Obstacle Course Races) –

For the adventurous at heart, Obstacle Course Races will fire up your fitness engines! These races offer courses of varying distance and difficulty to accommodate any person. You will run, jump, climb and crawl over as many as 20 different obstacles throughout the race. It requires full-body strength and agility, as well as endurance and mental toughness. And you can’t be afraid to get really dirty!

Obstacle course racing is steadily growing to be one of the most-participated races, with 1 million participants in 2011 and growing to 5.6 million in 2016. The most popular obstacle races are Rugged Maniac, Spartan™ Race and Tough Mudder. An added perk is that these races typically take place during a weekend-long festival including live music, food vendors and sponsor booths with free swag or samples. You can find race-specific training programs online (here is training for Spartan Race) or with local training groups depending on your location.

Since these races are a full-body challenge, taking care of your entire body is critical. Stretching and injury-prevention from head to toe will help you fly across the fire pit at the finish line. Cho-Pat straps and compression sleeves offer a full line of soft supports and muscle compression items to reduce pain and improve recovery post-race. 2Toms SportShield is a waterproof, sweat proof anti-chafe that will last throughout the entire course, protecting your skin from chafe and blisters. 2Toms GripShield will keep your hands dry and sweat-free for those tough rope climbs. The 2Toms StinkFree® line will wash all of your dirty, sweaty, muddy clothes and shoes so you’re ready for the next obstacle challenge!

goat yoga

Kristen Carter Photography

  1. Yoga Trends –

Yoga Trends? Yes! Yoga has been around for centuries, but it wasn’t until this past year that yoga became more…umm, creative! And we suspect it will get only wackier in 2018.  Between hot yoga, beer yoga, goat yoga or silent yoga, you can choose any style or animal for your yoga adventure. Fitness trends overall have responded to the increased popularity of building a social community around health, but yoga has really Omm’d the space (sorry for the pun!). Making a yoga session more of an event has boosted its appeal among many who have never tried yoga before. Business Insider has a neat video of Five Weird Yoga Trends that Took Off in 2017.  Ask your local studio if they’ll let Scruffy join you for downward dog!

While sipping your IPA during yoga is fun, slipping on your mat or having your Lululemon pants hang on to post-sweat smell is not. Check out 2Toms FootShield™ to prevent your feet from sweating and creating odor in your sandals or shoes. Even hot yoga is no match for FootShield! 2Toms StinkFree Detergent will rid your favorite yoga pants, and all of your fitness gear, of sweaty, funky smells. It’s non-fragranced but does scientifically remove bacteria from technical materials to ensure that odor is eradicated.

As you begin this New Year, I encourage you to step out of your comfort zone and try out a new fitness trend! And while new challenges are exciting, please remember to go at your own pace, gradually build up to harder exercises and take time for rest and recovery. Medi-Dyne® and 2Toms offer a complete line of products to help you achieve your #fitgoals in 2018!

Shin Splints: Too Much Too Soon

ShinSplint_PinPost_2017

Shin splints typically occur below the knee either on the front outside part of the leg (anterior shin splints) or the inside of the leg (medial shin splints), and almost EVERY athlete has experienced them. They usually occur in beginning runners that increase their mileage too quickly or veteran runners, who add speed work, change of terrain or too much volume to their workout routines. Basically, shin splints are always caused by TOO MUCH TOO SOON.

The Causes

There can be a number of imbalances happening at once which make the cause of your shin splints hard to pinpoint, but here are a few of the main causes. Overpronation (a frequent cause of medial shin splints), inadequate stretching, old shoes or shoes that are not right for your body and foot type, excessive stress placed on one leg or one hip from running on cambered roads or always running in the same direction on a track, and the most common, doing too much too soon.

The Symptoms

It is hard to define what a shin splint is since there is no end-all consensus among sports scientists and doctors. Most believe they are small tears in the muscle that’s pulled off the bone, an inflammation of the thin sheath of tissue that wraps around the tibia, or shin bone, an inflammation of the muscle, or some combination of these. The most common symptom for shin splints is pain in the medial area (the inside of the shin) or anterior area (toward the outside of the leg). So while the experts can’t agree on what they are exactly, they do agree on how to treat them.

The Treatments

Sadly, most experts agree that you should stop running completely or decrease your training depending on the extent and duration of pain. Then during the acute phase, you need to ice your shin to reduce inflammation. The best method of icing is freezing water in Dixie cups and doing an ice massage on the area. After you bring the inflammation down, here are some other treatments to try:

1) Stretching: Stretch your Achilles if you have medial shin splints, and your calves if you have anterior shin splints. The best way to do this is to use the Pro-Stretch by Medi-Dyne. You can also gently stretch your shins by kneeling on a mat, legs and feet together and toes pointed directly back. Then slowly sit back onto your calves and heels. Push your ankles into the floor until you feel tension in the muscles of your shin. Hold for 10 to 12 seconds, relax and repeat 3-5 times. ShinSplints_TooMuchTooSoon-Pic1

2) Strengthen: In a standing position, balance on one leg and spell out the alphabet on the floor or in the air with your toes. Do this with each leg. Another great strength exercise is to alternate walking on your heels for 30 seconds with 30 seconds of regular walking. Repeat 4-5 times. These exercises are good for both recovery and prevention. Try to do them three times a day at least 3x a week.

ShinSplints_TooMuchTooSoon-Pic2

 

3) Compression: Compression binds the tendons up against the shaft of the shin to prevent stress. So if you continue running and reduce your volume, wrap your leg before you run. You can use either tape or an Ace bandage, starting just above the ankle and continuing to just below the knee. You can wear compression sleeves or compression socks too, my favorite are Cho-Pat Calf Compression Sleeve or the Shin Splint Compression Sleeve. Just make sure you keep wrapping your leg until the pain goes away, which usually takes three to six weeks.

ShinSplints_TooMuchTooSoon-Pic3

 

4) Cross-Train: Cross-Train for a while to let your shin heal. Swim, run in the pool, elliptical, strength train or ride a bike. When you return to running, increase your mileage slowly, no more than 10 percent weekly.

 

5) Proper Shoes: You need to wear the correct running shoes for your foot type. Go to your local running store and have an associate fit you. Typically,  overpronators should wear motion-control shoes. Severe overpronators may need orthotics. When you find a pair or two that are comfortable and work for your feet, make sure to buy two pairs and alternate wearing them to vary the stresses on your legs.

 

6) Terrain: Avoid hills and excessively hard surfaces until shin pain goes away completely, and then re-introduce them gradually to prevent a recurrence. If the roads you run on are cambered, run out and back on the same side of the road. Likewise, when running on a track, switch directions.

 

Luckily, shin splints can usually be dealt with quickly by looking at your training and your biomechanics. Just make sure you do more than just ice and take inflammation pills. You won’t prevent re-injury unless you find and fix the underlying cause.

 

MeghanKennihan-bio_pic About Meghan:

Meghan is a USA Track & Field coach and a RRCA (Road Runners of America) certified distance coach. She is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy   of Sports Medicine and a level 3 USA Cycling Coach. She has over 12 years of experience teaching spin classes, weight-lifting, and group exercise. Meghan is   also experienced runner, ultrarunner, and triathlete competing, winning, and placing in 5Ks, 10Ks, half-marathons, marathons, ultra distances, and triathlons. She also holds multiple state Powerlifting records. Learn more about Meghan www.trainwithmeghan.com

Medi-Dyne is proud to have Meghan as an Athlete Ambassador.

 

* Consult your doctor for proper diagnosis and rehabilitation.

The Woes of Smelly Hockey Equipment

IceHockeyPhoto1

The Woes of Smelly Hockey Equipment

By: Patrick Smith

 

No matter how often I played, whether it was the three games on the weekend when I was younger, or the drop in hockey I play now, my equipment would always smell like a dumpster.

My name is Patrick, and I’ve been playing hockey off and on for 17 years. I started playing on roller blades when I was first learning how to skate and then transferred over to ice hockey. I used to be involved with youth leagues, but they were hard to find because Texas is not exactly the hockey capital of the world. I eventually grew up and ended my dreams of playing for the Dallas Stars. Nowadays, I go to the occasional open hockey at the local Dr. Pepper StarCenter. Over the years I’ve learned a thing or two about how to keep my equipment smelling fresh and not offending my mother or my teammates.

Hockey players have more equipment than most sports. Try fitting skates, long socks, shin pads, shorts, shoulder pads, elbow pads, gloves, helmet, and any other stuff that I forget to pack into a hockey bag. Hockey players know that all the excess ice from a game or practice will find its way into the bag no matter what we do. Add the sweating we just did, and the bag now smells like roses.

As soon as I got home, I would open my hockey bag, and the smell hit me right away. Even if I was tired, I had to string out my hockey equipment around the garage. I put my shoulder pads on a tool hook, gloves on top of my hockey net, skates laced together around the chair, and just threw everything else on the floor like normal. Add a few games, scrimmages, and practices to your mileage and the neighbors may come over to file a complaint about the smell. Leaving the equipment out in the garage for the Texas heat to enjoy wasn’t helping either.

My mom just wasn’t having it. If something stinks in her house, “Forget about it,” as New Yorkers would say. I applied Febreze to my equipment after every skate because my pads would always smell like how I played my last game, terrible. Yeah, like that did anything. My equipment then had the distinct smell of opening up a bottle of Febreze and dumping the liquid onto the gear. The Febreze just masked the smell, not eliminate the odor.

Now with hockey equipment, there is no dumping it in the washing machine. With all the pads and straps, good luck not breaking the washer or ruining your gear. Unless you want to do laundry for 8 hours, you also can’t just wash one piece of gear at a time you water waster.

The one thing that partially worked was treating my equipment like it was a car wash. I laid out my gear on the patio furniture, filled up a small bucket with water and soap, and used a sponge to hand wash all the equipment except for the skates. I used a mild soap because how do I know if it will ruin my pads? Afterwards, I rinsed it all off with the garden hose and let it air dry overnight. Washing the pads seemed to work, but not so great. Honestly, if I just got home from a hard game or practice, the last thing I’m thinking about is making sure my equipment is squeaky clean. I did the hockey car wash about once every month.

I found that hanging the gear out to dry when I got home from playing hockey was the best way to combat odors. Turning the fan on my pads helped out too. Hockey equipment is costly, and we couldn’t afford the best pads, so taking care of your equipment is very important. However, It may be beneficial to buy new hockey pads whenever the old ones got smelly. For the sake of either your Mother or teammates, I’d suggest making sure your hockey equipment is clean.

In addition to fighting the odor, it’s important to understand the health concerns that come with smelly hockey gear, especially if bacteria are involved. If you’ve taken a slash to the back of the leg or puck to the neck as I have, your open wounds can be prone to bacterial infections. Many medical studies have shown the link between unclean sports equipment and bacterial infections such as staph, strep, and folliculitis to name a few. To help us smelly hockey players, ProStock Hockey has made an easy-to-follow chart on how to clean hockey equipment.

 

JPG PSH

 

 

This post is brought to you by 2Toms StinkFree Shoe & Gear Spray and 2Toms StinkFree Detergent.

Stink Free® Spray is guaranteed to remove, not mask, all odors caused by sweat left in your shoes, boots, gear, gym bags, pads/guards, gloves, lockers, etc.  Stink Free Spray has no perfume in its formula, therefore it leaves behind no smell once dry.

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Remove odor, don’t just mask it! Stink Free Sports Detergent removes odors and stains in high-performance athletic apparel using proprietary residue lifter and odor neutralizer. Stink Free Sports Detergent restores clothing performance and breathability while eliminating, not masking the odor.

 

SF Det_cutout

 

 

Learn more about 2Toms and its line of chafe, blister, odor prevention at 2toms.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Top Causes of Knee Pain

Most Common Causes of Knee Pain

Sports Knee pain concept

Knee pain can be debilitating, but there are ways to treat it so you can become pain-free once again. You just need to know the underlying cause before you can get treatment for your discomfort. So take a look at the most common causes of knee pain, along with some effective treatment options that can get you on the road to recovery.

Meniscus Tear

Your knee contains a firm, flexible type of cartilage called a meniscus. When you injure this part of your knee, it’s called a meniscus tear. This is one of the most common types of knee injuries, especially among athletes who play sports like football, soccer, volleyball or any activity that requires you to quickly switch directions while running.

The symptoms of a meniscus tear include a pop when the injury occurs, followed by knee pain, swelling and difficulty either straightening or bending the leg. While a small meniscus tear may heal on its own with the help of some rest, ice and an elastic bandage, more severe tears often require knee surgery.

Ligament Injuries

Aside from cartilage, your knee also contains ligaments that connect the thigh bone to the bones in the lower leg. It’s common for athletes to tear or sprain the ligaments, especially the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL. This is another knee injury that may occur when you suddenly switch directions while running, which is why you might often hear about ACL injuries among famous football and basketball players.

Like the meniscus tear, you might notice a pop when you injure a ligament in your knee. It may be followed by pain, swelling, limited mobility and the inability to put any weight on it. The most important step for treating this knee injury is to let the area rest, along with applying ice to it and supporting it with an elastic bandage. Many people end up also needing either physical therapy or surgery to repair the ligament.

Arthritis

There are a few types of arthritis that affect the knee. The most common type is osteoarthritis, in which the cartilage in the knee is gradually worn down. This can lead to knee pain, swelling, stiffness and limited mobility. Another type is rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease that results in inflammation of the tissue near the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis is also a common cause of knee pain, and it occurs after you’ve injured your knee in some way and damaged the cartilage.

The symptoms of arthritis can make the knee swell, hurt, and feel stiff and hard to move. The treatment for this cause of knee pain depends on the type of arthritis and symptoms that are present. But it generally includes medication to reduce inflammation and pain, the use of knee braces and bandages, physical therapy, or surgery.

Fractures

If you were in a car accident, experienced a fall or had some other type of trauma done to your body, it’s possible that your knee pain is caused by a fracture of the knee bones. If the pain is severe and you cannot walk, you should talk to your doctor to find out if you’ve broken a bone in the knee, such as your kneecap.

If it turns out your knee is fractured, you will likely need a cast and crutches so the bone can heal over time. Eventually you should be able to get the cast off and start using a knee brace or compression sleeve to support the area when you walk.

In fact, you can often reduce knee pain of any kind by providing extra support with a knee strap or compression sleeve any time you plan to be active. Fortunately, there are lots of products on the market that can relieve your knee pain. Your doctor can advise you before you choose the right one.

Visit www.cho-pat.com to learn more about pain solutions for knee pain.

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/meniscustear#1

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/anterior-cruciate-ligament-acl-injuries-treatment-overview

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/physical-rehabilitation-for-acl-injuries

http://www.everydayhealth.com/pain-management/knee-pain/osteoarthritis-of-the-knee.aspx

http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/pain-management/tips/25-treatments-for-hip-knee-oa.php

http://www.medi-dyne.com/injury-treatment/knee-pain/

10 Ways to Stay Motivated and Focused on Fitness Goals

runner at sunset

Medi-Dyne’s Athlete Ambassador and Guest Blogger, Meghan Kennihan,

has 10 tips for staying on track with your fitness and health goals!

Did you make a training goal for 2017? Sign up for a spring, summer, or fall race? Have you already lost your motivation? If so, I am here to help. Don’t despair! Here are 10 tips to get your MOJO back and ACHIEVE your goals.

 

  • Get Paid! : Money is the ultimate motivator. The best way to sustain motivation is immediate gratification. Put a dollar in a jar every time you workout for more than 30 minutes.  Use the money at the end of the month to reward yourself with a night on the town, massage, or spa treatment.
  • Get Help! : Enlist the help of a personal trainer or run coach. Not only will they be able to show you the best exercises for you but they also will teach you proper technique to avoid injury and hold you accountable for your goals.
  • Get Happy! : Exercise has a wonderful ability to flood your body and brain with “happy” endorphins but you will counteract this benefit if you are dreading every step. Choose a workout you enjoy. There are so many ways to exercise. If you don’t like running take a cycling class or kickboxing class. If you like to be solo jump on the elliptical machine or stairclimber. The more enjoyable it is, the more likely you’ll be to stick with it.
  • Get Real! : Set realistic goals and write them down. Don’t just say “I resolve to lose 20 lbs” or “I will go to the gym more often”. Make your goals specific. Write down a series of smaller goals leading up to the “big one”. Set a time table to accomplish them (i.e. “I will go to the gym 3 days a week to do 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise”). Writing your goals down lets you monitor your improvements and is a good review when your motivation is waning.
  • Get Social!: Make an appointment to meet up with a friend or neighbor to exercise. If you have someone relying on you to go to the gym or go for a run you’ll be less likely to cancel. Also, if you like to bike, run, or swim, join a club. The social component makes it fun and the group will provide accountability. Similarly, sign up for a class, if you paid you might as well get your money’s worth and your classmates will notice when you’re gone.
  • Get Techy!: There are so many tools to help you achieve your fitness goals. Heart rate monitors, pedometers, calorie trackers etc. make exercise more exciting because you can see the results of your efforts. For example, make a goal of 10,000+ steps a day and your pedometer will tell you if you have been negligent
  • Get Rest! : You have to allow your muscles to rest and rebuild. Exercising hard everyday is just as detrimental as not exercising at all. One of the biggest reasons people stop exercising is because they go out too fast and push too hard and get injured. Listen to your body and if you are having an off-day, take it easy and rest.
  • Get Loud! : Make a workout playlist with your favorite upbeat songs. Studies have found that men and women who do their workouts to music, workout longer and at a higher intensity than those who workout in silence. Music helps the person working out not to concentrate on the discomforts of the exercises, thus allowing them to exert more or try new things in the working out process.
  • Get Variety!: Cross-training is the key to staying injury free and keeping your body continuously challenged. If you don’t change your workouts your body only trains one set of muscles, your muscles will adapt to the monotony and you will stop seeing results. To avoid a fitness plateau make sure you incorporate different strength training, cardiovascular, balance, and flexibility exercises into your workout.
  • Get Healthy!: All your hard work will go to waste if you eat all the calories you just worked so hard to burn off. It’s a simple equation, in order to lose weight, calories in have to be less than calories out. Try to eat mini meals throughout the day to keep your metabolism going strong. Don’t deprive yourself of your favorite foods just think moderation. So, instead of having your own super-sized French fry, have a few from your child’s Happy Meal.

 

Now …..GET GOING!

MeghanKennihan-bio_pic  About Meghan:

Meghan is a USA Track & Field coach and a RRCA (Road Runners of America) certified distance coach. She is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy   of Sports Medicine and a level 3 USA Cycling Coach. She has over 12 years of experience teaching spin classes, weight-lifting, and group exercise. Meghan is also an   experienced runner, ultrarunner, and triathlete competing, winning, and placing in 5Ks, 10Ks, half-marathons, marathons, ultra distances, and triathlons. She also holds   multiple state Powerlifting records. Learn more about Meghan www.trainwithmeghan.com

Medi-Dyne is proud to have Meghan as an Athlete Ambassador.

2016 Holiday Fit Gift Guide

2016 Holiday Gift Guide

By Medi-Dyne Ambassador & Guest Blogger

Jen Haught

Happy Holidays Red

 

The holiday season is once again upon us and if you are like me, you struggle with what to get your loved ones. I always want my gift to be well received, but I look for other details as well; for example, can I get it from a local business? Is it made in the USA? Would it be useful to them? Would they even want it? No wonder people say the holidays are stressful!

 

I picked out ten gifts that I think your favorite athlete would enjoy and secretly won’t return behind your back.

 

 

Five1Five Signs

 

I stumbled on Five1Five Signs medal holders a couple years ago and am a huge fan. Their signs are unique because they are hand painted carved wood signs, not just vinyl letters like most other signs. I have one in my office and I have given out a few as gifts and people really love them. These signs aren’t just for runners, but for swimmers, gymnasts, triathletes and more. Contact Andy and you can have it personalized so your favorite athlete can hang their medals proudly!

 

 

 

 

TigerLady

 

When I was a runner, I would do the majority of my running in the dark by myself, especially when the time changed in November. I was ALWAYS decked out head to toe in reflective gear, lights, and bright colors, but all that gear wouldn’t have saved me from an attacker. Tiger Lady is safety at your fingertips. It is small, light weight, and needs no batteries or charging. I had no issues running with it and it made me feel A LOT safer no matter where I was. I carry it when I’m not running as well so instead of holding onto my phone in my hand, I replaced with a Tiger Lady. No one coming up to attack me would suspect that I had a self defense claw in my hand. To activate the three claws, all you have to do is close your hand and make a fist. The retractable claws protrude between your knuckles ready to meet your attacker. I feel confident and very Wolverine-like when I have my Tiger Lady.

 

 

 

RangeRoller

 

The RangeRoller is no joke. It gives you a a deep massage that you wouldn’t believe! The roller gets in the inner and outer layers of muscles and tissue to help break up and eliminate scar tissue, increase circulation and is effective getting out those nasty knots from just about anywhere. My husband, myself and even our dogs love it!

 

 

Road ID

 

I think Road ID is probably the number one item that every athlete should have because it can save your life. They make these bracelets for adults and children and they make them in a variety of styles and colors. Your personal and medical information can be accessed from medical personnel through their website. They will be able to access your emergency contacts, your doctors, insurance information, medications, allergies, surgeries, and so much more. You can go online and update it anytime you want. If you don’t have one, GET ONE! It will give you and your loved ones piece of mind when you are out on the roads.

 

 

CopyCat Yoga Mat

 

I came across the Copycat Yoga Mat on Etsy and I thought this was such a cool product. I was a disaster at yoga and never knew where to put my hands and feet for poses. I’d feel frustrated and miss instructions on breathing or other information. In class, I felt self conscious and I think this mat will really help adults and children learn yoga with confidence. Not only does the mat show foot and hand placement, but it shows different poses like Triangle and Halfmoon. The mat is non toxic, eco friendly, phthalate and latex free, SGS tested and certified. It is extra thick (1/4″ which is twice as thick than a standard yoga mat), extra long (72″ x 24″ which is 4″ longer than a standard yoga mat) and self adjusts to work with any height.

 

 

 

 

Pro-stretch Plus

 

If your favorite athlete complains of achilles tendonitis, ankle pain, back pain, calf strain and tight calf muscles, arch pain, plantar fasciitis, heel pain, ball of foot pain, tight hamstring pain, IT band syndrome, and/or shin pain, then the Pro-stretch Plus is going to help them. It helps give you an effective and comfortable stretch that will help prevent future injuries. You are going to save them so much pain, aggravation, and frustration, plus YOU won’t have to hear them keep complaining about their pain every time you talk to them. It’s a win-win!

 

 

 Shwings

 

I came across the Shwings a few years ago and immediately fell in love with them. They have over 150 styles in all different colors and will make all your shoes look unique and fun! They have wings, lighting bolts, skulls, butterflies, and even mustaches! They have been featured in magazines such as InStyle, UsWeekly, Parents and more. They are a perfect stocking stuffer for kids and adults of all ages. I have three pairs myself!

 

 

 

 

“The Long Run” by Matt Long

 

I’m constantly talking about Matt Long and his inspiring book, “The Long Run”. While bike riding, Matt was hit by a twenty ton bus making an illegal turn and his bike “sliced him open like a can”. He needed sixty eight units of blood 10 hours after the accident and was in the hospital for five months. Every bone in his left leg was broken, the right side of his pelvis was shattered, as well as his right shoulder and severed multiple arteries. He would endure over forty operations and the doctors weren’t even sure he would walk again, let alone compete. Matt’s book describes his intense and painful recovery and how he was able finish the NYC marathon three years after the accident. This story is incredible and I’m not lying when I say that I read it at least once a year.

 

 

 

 

 2Toms SportsShield Towelette

 

Ah, chafing, every runners nightmare. Since I was bigger runner I had lots of chafing issues and after a particular run while training for the NYC marathon last year, I realized BodyGlide wasn’t going to cut it. As I silently screamed in agony in the shower after a long run, I decided to try some new products. I came across 2Toms SportShield Towelettes during a Runchat, looked at their products and decided to try their towelettes and roll on. Since I’ve tried them, I haven’t had any chafing issues.  NOT ONE. I’m particularly fond of the towelettes because they are small and portable. I had been known to unwrap one and stick it down my bra for long runs just in case I’ve missed a spot.

 

 

 

 

 

BackBeat Fit Bluetooth Headphones

 

I actually won a pair of these BackBeat Fit headphones and I’m a huge fan. When we joined Rex Wellness Center earlier this year, I wanted a pair of wireless headphones because my wires kept getting caught on the machines and weights, it drove me crazy. It was easy hooking them up with my phone so I was happily watching Parks and Rec while on the bike or listening to JT while using the weight machines.  I found they were easy to use, comfortable and the sound is fantastic. It definitely drowns out crying babies and overly talkative adults on airplanes.

 

 

What is on your wishlist this year? 

jenhaught_biopicAbout Jen Haught: Jen grew up in Manchester, NH and then moved to the Raleigh, NC area in 2003 with her husband and two dogs, Jager and Sammy. She likes reading, make up, coloring, hiking, hockey, working out and being lazy.

Jen has overcome her share of injuries and  health and fitness struggles, but enjoys inspiring others to live their best happy, healthy lives.

You can reach Jen on Instagram @JenHaught or Twitter @JenHaught79. We are honored to have Jen as our November Guest Blogger and a Medi-Dyne Ambassador.

70 Ways to Use SportShield

70 Ways to Use SportShield

2Toms_SportShield_ShieldYourself

Here at Medi-Dyne, one of our most popular products at is our 2Toms SportShield. We have heard some pretty wild uses of SportShield so I went around and asked our coworkers, our friends, and our families to tell me the various uses of our 2Toms SportShield. The answers we got, some serious, some not so serious, were great! So without further ado, here are 70 ways to use SportShield!

  1. Nipple Chafing
  2. Inner Thigh Chafing
  3. Jeans Rubbing Your Legs
  4. Armpit Chafing
  5. Biking
  6. Under Boobs
  7. Neck Chafing
  8. Waist
  9. Swimsuit/ Bikini Chafe
  10. Stomach Chafe
  11. Wiping it all over your body and then going down a water slide
    Child on water slide at aquapark show thumb up. Summer water park holiday. Outdoor.
    11. Going down a water slide
  12. Using it to make somebody slip as a prank
  13. To Keep your doors from creaking
  14. Perfect for an ideal slip’N’slide
  15. To avoid getting tackled in football
  16. To stop soccer shin guard chafe
  17. Stop brakes on a car from squeaking
  18. Put on a wetsuit
  19. To avoid the various surfing chafes
  20. Stops Disney Land/ theme park chafing
  21. Neck Chafe from Dirtbike helmet
  22. Prevent chafing during Pokemon Go

  23. Ballet feet
  24. Substitute for banana in Mario Kart
  25. Prime MoonWalking
  26. Horseback Riding Chafe
  27. Slick up your body for MMA
  28. Put on a door handle and make it tough to grip
  29. Put on the back seat of your motorcycle to ditch a bad date

  30. To be slick in boxing
  31. Slick Fireman’s Pole
  32. Pool Cue Slick
  33. Mud Wrestling
  34. Protect Puppy Paws
    adorable seated labrador retriever puppy dog on white background
    34. Protect Puppy Paws
  35. Put on Snowboard or Skis to go faster
  36. Putting on tights
  37. Putting on a swim Cap
  38. To keep your headphones from getting tangled
  39. To make sure your sunglasses don’t chafe your ears
  40. Sequin Chafe
  41. To keep your back from sticking to a floatie

  42. Neck chafe from football helmet
  43. Under your watch to keep it from chafing
  44. Put on clothing tags
  45. Seatbelts in a racecar
  46. To put on a wakeboard or a water ski
  47. Help put on latex gloves
  48. Back of ankle with high heels
  49. Bluetooth earpiece chafe
  50. (For horse) To stop saddle chafe
  51. Stop necklaces from chafing
  52. To glide through the water in a swimming race

  53. Stop short drawstring chafe
  54. Prevent cauliflower ear in wrestling
  55. Divers to minimize splash
  56. New shoe chafe
  57. Removing rings from your hand
    isolated young man with using crutche

    70. Chafing from crutches

  58. Sliding into home plate
  59. Doing the Cha Cha Slide

  60. Earring insertion
  61. Skateboard wheel lube
  62. Keep pimple from rubbing on clothes
  63. Body massages
  64. Bicycle Chain Lube
  65. Keep puppy hair from knotting

  66. Climbing a tree
  67. Keeping a lei from chafing
  68. Scuba Diving Gear
  69. Dance floor chafing
  70. Chafing from crutches

What we found out is that SportShield can apparently be used for almost anything! While they all certainly sound fun, we feel the need to say try at your own risk! We hope you guys enjoy all of the different SportShield uses as much as we do!

Did we miss any new uses? Let us know!

Read more about SportShield here!

SCARIEST Word for Runners: INJURY

SCARIEST Word for Runners: INJURY

Runner with ankle injury has sprained and strained ankle.

Here is how to NEVER hear that frightening word.

Medi-Dyne is proud to welcome back Athlete Ambassador Meghan Kennihan as our guest blogger.

KNOW YOUR LIMITS

Every runner has an injury threshold and it is different for everyone. Some people can run 120 miles a week and some can only run 20, but if you exceed your threshold you are asking for injury. Most runners get injured because they do too much, too soon, too fast. Training errors are the number one cause of self-inflicted running injuries. When you rush the process of building up mileage or try to run too fast your body does not have time to recover and handle the increasing demands you are inflicting on it. Most doctors, physical therapists, and chiropractors will tell you to build your mileage by no more than 10% a week, which is a general rule, however, you may only be able to build by 5%. Each runner is different so make sure you listen to your body and KNOW YOUR LIMITS. It’s a good idea to alternate hard and easy days to give your body the recovery it needs from speed workouts, long runs, hill training etc. Make sure you incorporate rest weeks into your training plan every three weeks and keep a detailed log of your mileage and how you feel after your runs so you can recognize when problems start to occur.

LISTEN TO YOUR BODY

Don’t run through pain. The majority of running injuries come on gradually and can be stopped if you catch them early. This means a shorter recovery period. Aches and pains do come with running but persistent aches and pains do not. If a pain causes you enough discomfort that you alter your gait, it’s time to stop. Take 2-3 days off, cross-train if you need to and then test out your “injury” gradually. If you’re pain free, get back to your normal routine. If it still hurts, you may need to see a doctor and find out the root cause of the pain, or you may just need more time off.

STRENGTH TRAIN

It is very important for runners to have strong hip and core muscles. When you strengthen your inner and outer thighs, your butt, and your transverse abdominis (stabilizing abdominal muscles) you increase your leg stability all the way down to your feet. Lying leg raises, inner thigh raises, clams, planks, and side planks are great exercises to add to your training program.

R.I.C.E

Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation are great when you have aches and pains in your muscles and joints. These four things can help relieve your pain, reduce swelling and send blood to those tissues to help speed the healing process. However, many runners neglect the REST part of the equation and continue to run then ice, then run the next day and ice again. This may take the pain away for a short time but you are not giving the tissues any time to heal before you are pounding away at them again. Elevating and compressing the area with a bandage or towel will also help reduce the inflammation. Then make sure you REST the next day and give your body a chance to heal, rather than running and prolonging the injury. Do not take NSAIDs except for acute injuries; instead try turmeric pills or anti-inflammatory foods such as salmon, blueberries, or leafy greens.

VARY RUNNING SURFACES

If you are always running a cambered road you are putting more pressure on your one leg over and over and over which can easily lead to hip and knee problems on that side. Also the road has no give to it and when you land all that impact (2-3x your body weight) is going right back into your legs. Try to do some of your runs, especially your long runs, on level surfaces and if possible soft surfaces such as crushed limestone, trails, even a bike path. The treadmill can also offer a forgiving surface if you can stand the boredom.

Sports Knee pain

TOO MUCH SPEED

There is such a thing as too much speedwork and too much racing. Those efforts are near max and can be very hard on your body and your mind. Doing speedwork twice a week then racing on the weekend does not give your body or mind sufficient rest. Even elite runners limit their speedwork to no more than 5-10% at 5K pace and no more than 20% at tempo or threshold pace. A good rule of thumb for racing is to take one day of recovery for every mile raced.

CROSS-TRAIN

Running is very hard on the body, 2-3x your body weight with each stride, make sure you take at least one day of rest each week and consider making one of your run days a “cross-training” day. Cross-training can improve your muscle balance and work muscles that you never knew you had. Activities such as swimming, cycling, elliptical and rowing will improve your aerobic fitness and even help your running.

YOU’RE INJURED, NOW WHAT

If you have an injury, take this opportunity to make the best of it. Ask yourself what can I learn about myself? How can this time off help my running in the long term? What CAN I do… swim? Bike? Strength? PT?

Try to find the cause of your injury, muscle imbalance? Shoe? Training? Nutrition? But be prepared to come up empty and to heal up and return to running without knowing the cause of the pain that made you stop. This mind set will enable you to get through your injuries with less stress and anxiety. The most important thing is to accept that time is the only real healer, and try not to layer extra stress and anxiety onto the injury experience by grasping at healing measures like ultrasounds, electric stem, graston, steroids, acupunture etc. and expecting miracles from them.

Disclaimer: Please consult your physician before continuing to exercise through any pain or discomfort. The training tips and treatments in this article are suggestions based on years of training and experience, but should not replace a treatment plan prescribed by your doctor.

About Meghan:

Meghan Kennihan - Athlete AmbassadorMeghan is a USA Track & Field coach and a RRCA (Road Runners of America) certified distance coach. She is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine and a level 3 USA Cycling Coach. She has over 12 years of experience teaching spin classes, weight-lifting, and group exercise. Meghan is also an experienced runner, ultrarunner, and triathlete competing, winning, and placing in 5Ks, 10Ks, half-marathons, marathons, ultra distances, and triathlons. She also holds multiple state Powerlifting records. Learn more about Meghan www.trainwithmeghan.com

Medi-Dyne is proud to have Meghan as an Athlete Ambassador.

Summer HEAT: How to Run, Train, and Race!

Summer Heat: How to Run, Train, and Race!

Ambassador Blogger: Meghan Kennihan

MeghanKennihan-bio_pic

 

Medi-Dyne Ambassador: Meghan Kennihan

@TrainWithMeghan

It’s that time again. The hottest part of the summer.  Heat is probably one of the worst uncontrollable elements runners face. The effects of heat and humidity on your training and racing not only cause suffering in the moment but also hinder your recovery.

The Problems with HEAT:

Sweat and Fluid Loss:

Running in the heat causes your core body temperature to rise which means you start to feel worse and worse just like when you have a fever. Heat impacts runners at a physiological level through dehydration, increased heart rate, and reduced blood flow/oxygen to the muscles used for running. Your body cools itself and maintains balance through sweat. Sweat has a cooling effect on the body because it removes excess heat through evaporation. However, the rate of evaporation and how well the body is cooled depends on the humidity. When humidity is low, evaporation increases and you will be able to cool yourself better but you will be losing fluid quickly. When humidity is high, evaporation decreases, less cooling occurs and you suffer even more. The fluid loss and dehydration from fluid loss also effects running performance, a loss of 2% of body weight leads to about 4-6% drop in performance.

Heart Rate and Blood Flow:

Another problem is that temperature and humidity increase your heart rate and amplify these effects. At 60-75 degrees your heart rate increases by 2-4 beats per minute. From 75-90 degrees it can increase up to 10 beats per minute and the humidity will make it increase even more. Rate of perceived exertion are much greater as temperature and humidity rise too. Making matters worse is that when you sweat your blood volume decreases which means  less blood returns to your heart, less reaches your hard working muscles and  you produce less energy. This will cause you to run slower at a given effort level.  For every 10 degree increase in air temperature above 55 degrees there is a 1.5-3% increase in average finishing time for a marathon. (i.e. An extra 3-6 minutes for a 3:30 marathon with every 10 degree increase).  Another issue is that when the heat needs to be dissipated, a lot of the blood also gets diverted to the skin.  Again, the oxygen is redirected via blood flow to your skin instead of your muscles, thus you have less energy for running and your heart and lungs have to work harder to make up for the loss. Higher heart rate at a set pace and higher perceived exertion are the result.

Slow Recovery:

Heat and humidity effect your recovery too! After you exercise in hot conditions, your body needs to spend more energy on cooling itself rather than delivering nutrients to your muscles who need the repair. The muscles have been damaged by the workout but  can’t get the nutrients they need to repair  and recovery is slower. Slower recovery can mean that you might not be ready for  your next hard workout or race.

Enough of the BAD NEWS! Let’s figure out what to do about it!

Train in the Heat:

Training alone provides a bit of an adaption because a side effect of running is an increase in total plasma volume and blood which plays an important role in the cooling process, so the fittest athletes typically have the highest plasma volume and can therefore adapt more easily to heat. Running in hot conditions can result in making it easier to maintain a faster pace, reduce rate of perceived exertion, higher blood plasma volume, increased sweat rate, decrease in salt in sweat, reduced heart rate at a given pace and temperature, and a quicker onset of sweating.  How about that for some great changes just from training? And bonus! it only about 2 weeks of heat exposure. Still, heat acclimatization can only take you so far…

Adjust Your Pace Expectations:

It is smart to adjust expectations when running in the heat… learn to adjust the level of effort or intensity based on what your body is signaling to you.  It’s important that you find ways to adjust your workout times and race paces to reflect how you’ll perform in hot conditions. There are plenty of “temperature” calculators for running where you enter your race times and the temperature and they will adjust your expectations for you. Thank you technology!

Hydrate Properly:

Staying hydrated is essential to your run performance and training.  Dehydration in athletes leads to fatigue, headaches, decreased coordination, and muscle cramping. In extreme cases heat exhaustion and heatstroke, can occur. Runners need to pay attention to what and how much they’re drinking before, during and after exercise especially in the hot summer months.

 Before Your Runs:

If you are training or racing for an hour or more it’s important to make sure you are well hydrated for a few days before. How do you know you are well-hydrated? You should eliminate pale urine at least six times a day. In days leading up to your long run, race, or hard training day make sure you drink plenty of water and nonalcoholic beverages. Alcohol Before your run drink about 16 ounces of water or electrolyte drink like Nuun or coconut water.

During Your Runs:

Drinking on the Run is EASY just drink to thirst. Scientific evidence says that drinking when you’re thirsty can help prevent underhydrating or overhydrating.

Research has shown that sports drinks enhance performance significantly more than plain water in high-intensity and long-duration runs and races.
Some good sports drinks are Nuun, Osmo, Skratch Labs, and Hammer Nutrition.

Your Unique Sweat Rate:

Everyone’s fluid needs are different. The above guidelines are general but some sweat more than others. If you want to get scientific about your hydration needs. You can determine your sweat rate by weighing yourself naked before one of your training runs, and then again after. One pound of weight loss equals 1 pint of water loss. Calculate your sweat rate and use this to determine your fluid needs during a run or race. For example, if you lose 3 pounds during an hour run, that’s 3 pints or 48 ounces. So having about 8 ounces of water every 20 minutes would be helpful to your performance. Weather conditions will also affect your sweat rate and hydration needs so doing this test in different temperatures will provide you with even more accurate results.

After Your Run:

Drink 20 to 24 fl oz. of water for every pound lost after your run. If your urine is dark yellow, you need to keep rehydrating. It should be a light lemonade color.

Dress the Part:

 Dress appropriately for the weather. Your running clothes including your socks should be light in color and made of a wicking technical fiber. Technical fabrics pull moisture away from your body, keeping you cooler. Try to avoid 100% cotton, these fabrics absorb sweat and do not dry quickly which weighs down the clothing and can cause chafing. Make sure you apply 2Toms to all possible chafing areas like toes, heels, nipples, between the legs to ensure a comfortable run.

Pre-Cooling:

Another technique is pre-cooling. Pre-cooling is a technique that is used to lower your core body temperature before running. This ideally extends the amount of time you can run before your core temperature raises so high that it hurts your performance. Recent studies have shown that pre-cooling can significantly improve performance in hot and humid conditions. One study reported that pre-cooling can boost performance by 16%.  The best way to pre-cool is with a cooling vest that you wear 10-20 minutes before your run or race. However, if you don’t have the money for a vest you can eat a freeze pop or frozen sports drink slushy 10-20 minutes before your run. Another option is using frozen towels on your head and neck on your way to the track or trailhead.

You can do EVERYTHING I have mentioned above but when it comes down to the bottom line. It’s YOUR ATTITUDE. Instead of getting discouraged because you have to train, run, or race in the heat realize that everyone is dealing with the same conditions and have faith in yourself and have FUN! Be grateful you are running!

 

About Meghan:

Meghan is a USA Track & Field coach and a RRCA (Road Runners of America) certified distance coach. She is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine and a level 3 USA Cycling Coach. She has over 12 years of experience teaching spin classes, weight-lifting, and group exercise. Meghan is also an experienced runner, ultrarunner, and triathlete competing, winning, and placing in 5Ks, 10Ks, half-marathons, marathons, ultra distances, and triathlons. She also holds multiple state Powerlifting records. Learn more about Meghan www.trainwithmeghan.com

Medi-Dyne is proud to have Meghan as an Athlete Ambassador.

2Toms Introduces GripShield

Medi-Dyne Introduces 2Toms® GripShield® Grip Enhancing Gel

GripShield_logo

July 28, 2016 (Colleyville, TX) – Medi-Dyne, a leading producer of innovative pain prevention products announces the introduction of 2Toms® GripShield®.

2Toms GripShield is formulated to work fast to keep hands dry and enhance the grip of anyone who is concerned about wet sweaty hands including many athletes and those who work with their hands. Whether it is before or during activity, 2Toms GripShield delivers results by quickly drying hands and creating a moisture barrier to improve grip and enhance performance. GripShield can even be used inside of gloves, and may help prevent odor buildup as well! GripShield applies to a multitude of sports and activities that include, but are not limited to; tennis, baseball, basketball, bowling, cycling, football, golf, gymnastics, hockey, skiing, softball, mechanics, industrial work, or any activity in which a firm, dry grip is essential.

“GripShield is a natural extension of our 2Toms line of innovative products that simply and effectively protects and enhances people’s ability to be at their best,” states Craig DiGiovanni Vice President of Medi-Dyne. “GripShield will also be taking us in to new markets expanding the reach and exposure of all our brands.”

100% Guarantee: 2Toms GripShield comes with the 2Toms 100% guarantee. Users, if not completely satisfied will receive a full refund.

2Toms® products are made in the U.S.A.

About Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products

Medi-Dyne is a global company dedicated to providing easy-to-use pain relief and performance enhancing solutions that ensure peak performance. Medi-Dyne’s contributions include over sixty patented foot care, knee, blister care, stretching and strengthening innovations marketed under the well-recognized names of brands of: 2Toms®, Cho-Pat®, CoreStretch®, ProStretch®, RangeRoller™, StretchRite®, Tuli’s®.

 

Medi-Dyne.com

Contact:
Mandy Owens
Marketing Manager
(817)251-8660
mandy@medi-dyne.com

Medi-Dyne Welcomes New International Business Manager

Medi-Dyne Healthcare Appoints New International Business Manager

Growing International Division Adds Pizzolo to Lead

PizzoloEsteban_2016-web

Colleyville, TX – Medi-Dyne (http://www.medi-dyne.com) announced today that Esteban Pizzolo has joined the firm to further develop their growing portfolio of international accounts. Esteban Pizzolo comes with experience within the healthcare industry, having served as Account Manager at gingerCube Inc, a healthcare solutions technology company. Esteban joins the team with an MBA in International Business from Dallas Baptist University and is ready to focus on strategic planning, marketing and sales to nurture current partners and explore new business opportunities.

When asked about the favorite part of his new position, Esteban says, “I enjoy the possibility of interacting with the people and businesses from all parts of the world and to be able to expand relationships and impact different markets in various ways.”

Esteban is currently a member of Association of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA), Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Dallas Baptist University Alumni.

In his spare time, Esteban enjoys playing the bass guitar and writing his own lyrics. He is also a sports fanatic and plays soccer and tennis. “I also love to travel and get to know different places. I love the Caribbean, but I would like to travel to Italy and Barcelona, Spain someday,” Esteban says.

Medi-Dyne is excited to welcome Esteban to our team and encourage our partners to reach out to him for a quick introduction.

Esteban is available via:

Email: international@medi-dyne.com

Phone: 817-251-8660 Ex. 32

Skype-Username: esteban.medi-dyne

About Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products

Medi-Dyne is a global company dedicated to providing easy-to-use pain relief and performance enhancing solutions that ensure peak performance. Medi-Dyne’s contributions include over sixty patented foot care, knee, blister care, stretching and strengthening innovations marketed under the well-recognized names of brands of: 2Toms®, Cho-Pat®, CoreStretch®, ProStretch®, RangeRoller™, StretchRite®, Tuli’s®.

Medi-Dyne.com

Contact

Mandy Owens, Marketing Manager

817-251-8660

Mandy@Medi-Dyne.com

Row to Rio: 2016 US Rowing Team O’Leary/Tomek

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Row to Rio 2016: Interview with US Rowing Team Tomek/O’Leary

Rio De Janeiro 2016. It’s on the mind of every Team USA member competing there this August. In particular, this is what’s on the mind of Team USA rowers Meghan O’Leary and Ellen Tomek. For an Olympian, the road to the games in Rio is a long one full of bumps, twists, and turns. Meghan and Ellen were kind enough to spend a few minutes away from their training in Princeton, New Jersey to talk with us on the phone. Between talking about some of the controversy surrounding this year’s games, understanding the struggles of being an elite rower in the US, and learning their backgrounds, there was plenty to talk about. Here are some of the highlights of the conversation:

How did you guys get started in rowing?

Ellen: “I started rowing at the University of Michigan my freshman year as a walk-on athlete. I went to a tryout where they tested our fitness and rowing potential. I made the cut, stuck with it and eventually was put on scholarship.”

Meghan: “Ellen basically came straight here to the Princeton Training Center right after college. I had a little bit of a different path; I played volleyball and softball at the University of Virginia. I graduated and went to work full time with ESPN. It was a couple years later when I had just moved to Connecticut. I wanted to do something new and ended up just Googling rowing. This was about six years ago, the summer of 2010.  I literally didn’t know anything about the sport. They have a great rowing program at the University of Virginia and ironically, the head rowing coach had actually approached me while I was still at school and said ‘hey, you should try rowing.’ I think it kind of planted the seed. So I signed up for some learn-to-row sessions, absolutely fell in love with it, and I haven’t looked back since. I threw myself into it and managed to find myself at the National Training Center a little over a year later, in fall 2011.”

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Team O’Leary/Tomek crossing the finish line at trials (Courtesy of USRowing)

When did you know you were good enough?

Ellen: “I made the Beijing Olympic Team in 2008, just two years out of college. The first year that I was training with the squad I made the 2007 National Team. I ended up in the women’s double for the 2008 Olympics and 2009 National Team. After that, I was injured for quite a bit and ended up missing out on the London Games, but decided that I wasn’t done training. Once Meghan and I started rowing together in 2013, we knew we had potential and could be competitive internationally. We made it our goal to develop the boat together over the course of the full quadrennial. Even back when we started rowing together, three and half years ago, we always believed we had the potential to go to Rio and to win a medal.”

How many women were you competing against during trials?

Meghan: “The women’s double is a Trials boat, which means it is an open event and anyone can enter. It’s interesting and unique to the sport of rowing. Over the last few years there have been a variety of competitors and contenders trying to win the double and represent the United States in that boat. We have represented the United States in the women’s double since 2013. We may have been considered the favorites going in, but there were definitely a lot of great athletes there. There were seven other crews that we were competing against us for the right to represent the United States as the Olympic Women’s Double in Rio. It definitely wasn’t a sure thing going into the regatta, so we were nervous and are very proud of what we accomplished.”

 

Where does the money in the sport of rowing come from domestically and internationally?

Ellen: “We are supported by non-profit organizations, USRowing and the USOC. We earn a modest monthly living stipend that maybe covers rent and groceries. The lack of funding is in part due to rowing not being a mainstream sport, so there’s not as much visibility.”

Meghan: “Rowers are superstars in Great Britain, New Zealand, and many European countries. Several of those athletes make real salaries and have endorsements and sponsorships. They are sort of like the equivalent of the NBA and NFL stars we have here in the U.S. In many countries outside of the U.S., rowers can keep rowing for much longer because of the income potential, whereas here in the States it can be difficult to maintain a long career in the sport due solely to the need to support yourself and your family.”

Are you nervous about going to Rio for the obvious reasons?

Meghan: “You prepare for so long and train so hard that you want to be able to show up to the Olympics and perform at your highest level. You put in all these hours and then be faced with something you can’t control like the water quality or Zika, is frustrating but we can’t dwell on it. It’s scary, but the best thing we’re trying to do is not stress about it and prepare in the best ways we can: lots of bug spray, long sleeves, and minimizing exposure to the water, all that stuff.  It’s funny how some people have asked “Well, did you ever consider not going to Rio?” and we of course, answer ‘absolutely not!’ You don’t put your whole life into this only to say ‘no, thanks.’

Medi-Dyne Wristband Photo-web

Our employees are happy to have something they can wear to show their support for team O’Leary/Tomek!!

Getting to know these Olympians was an awesome experience. Medi-Dyne is proud to have Ellen Tomek and Meghan O’Leary as Athlete Ambassadors. Medi-Dyne wishes team O’Leary/Tomek the best of luck in the Rio games!!  Go Team USA!

Be sure to tune your tv to the Olympic Rowing Event on August 6-13 to cheer on Meghan, Ellen and Team USA!

 

 

Unique Holiday Gifts

Happy Holidays Red

Unique Holiday Gift Ideas

It’s never easy to find just the right holiday gift, especially for the person who has everything. Why not give them something that will keep them comfortable and pain free year-round?

Check out some great holiday gift ideas that will keep them moving and enjoying their passion…

Medi-Dyne’s unique and effective products keep people moving provide a great holiday gift for the active individual, runner, cyclist, triathlete or student athlete in your life.

Whether they’re suffering from (or trying to prevent):

  • back pain
  • plantar fasciitis
  • tight calf
  • tight hamstring
  • blisters
  • chafing

or just need to increase overall flexibility, Medi-Dyne products will keep them moving and enjoying what they love to do.

EARLY BIRD SPECIAL  – SAVE 20%

Order your holiday gift by 12/5/15 and save 20%.
Use Coupon Code:  20Holiday when ordering at The Medi-Dyne Store.

NOTE:  This discount cannot be combined with any other discount, including but not limited to Holiday Gift Guide video discount, master case discounts, or wholesale pricing. Valid only at the Medi-Dyne on-line store.

How to Avoid Swimsuit Chafe, Wetsuit Chafe and PFD Chafe

2Toms Swimsuit chafe preventionWhen we think about water activities its’ often a cool laps in the pool, the thrill of riding the waves, or even the excitement of the bang of the starting gun – but it’s not chafing.

Swimsuit chafe, wetsuit chafe, or life vest (PFD) chafe are certainly not part of the image but they too often become part of the reality; a reality that often interferes with training, change the mechanics of your stroke and can certainly spoil the fun.

Chafing happens due to friction, whether it’s skin-to-skin rubbing or friction between your skin and fabric such as your swimsuit, wetsuit or life vest. Regardless of the reason, the net result is often a painful burning or stinging sensation that can come on quickly and eventually escalate to becoming a bleeding open wound. These swimsuit chafe abrasions can become painful, the burning sensation become intolerable resulting sidelining you from your favorite activity.

Saltwater often accelerates the on-set of swimsuit chafe.  When you think about it, it makes sense. 2Toms Wetsuit chafe prevention Sea salt is often use for skin cleansing or even therapeutic baths but they’re never left on the skin for prolonged periods of time.  The continuous skin friction of an open water ocean swim, surfing or other salt water activity is prime conditions for swimsuit chafe. Saltwater swimsuit chafe or PFD chafe can escalate more quickly than in fresh water. Once the skin is broken, the salts and ions in the salt water cause cells to break open exposing more cells underneath to damage and the bacteria found in open water.

2Toms Wetsuit chafe protectionWhether you’re in the water for fun, competition or exercise, preventing swimsuit chafe before it starts is a priority for anyone planning on spending time in the water.

Recommended steps to preventing swimsuit chafe:

 

  1. Wear a bathing suit that fits well, one that stays in place but is not too loose or too tight. This applies to PFDs as well.
  2. Keep your bathing suit clean and dry. Remember to rinse it in fresh water after every use and put it back on after it dries. Dirt, debris and dried sweat increase the possibility of friction between your bathing suit and skin. Gentle, effective detergents like 2Toms StinkFree Detergent can be used in a sink, bucket or washing machine and are designed to deal with high-performance fabrics.
  3. Hydrate yourself so you can sweat freely.
  4. Rinse your body with fresh water to avoid sweat from sitting on your skin and forming salt crystals.
  1. Prevent chafing before it starts with 2Toms SportShield and SportShield for Her! Both of these products are designed to form a long-lasting, odor-neutral barrier that protects you from skin-to-skin and skin- fabric chafing.  SportShield will not affect the stitching of swimsuits as do some other petroleum-based products.
  2. To prevent swimsuit chafe, apply 2Toms SportShield anywhere there is a seam on the swimsuit or anywhere the PDF touches the skin.

So, next time you’re getting ready for a day of surfing, watersports, or a long pool training session, take a few minutes to shield yourself from swimsuit chafe!

2Toms SportsShield & SportShield for Her! Available in travel size!

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Ready to have a #StinkFreeSummer?

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Ready to have a #StinkFreeSummer ?
SF Det 30oz

Running clothes, high-performance fabrics, and sports gear are great but wow can they stink!

2Toms® Stink Free® Sports Detergent is GUARANTEED to remove  odors  & stains in your high performance athletic apparel! Using a revolutionary residue lifter, Stink Free restores clothing performance and breath ability.

No dyes or perfumes.

Stink Free Detergent doesn’t mask odors it eliminates them! With just 1 – 2 ounces your clothes come out of the wash smelling, well, like nothing!  Just clean & fresh.

100% Guaranteed!

Stink Free Sports Detergent is guaranteed to remove odors and stains in your high performance athletic apparel & any gear you can wash or soak including: Hockey pads, Shin Guards, Shoes, Cleats, Sleeping Bags, Pillows, Tents, Sleeping Mats, Hiking Boots, Backpacks, Hydration Packs, Motorcycle Gear, Yoga Mats, Towels, Uniforms, and much more!   Learn More

Get a sample & see for yourself!2Toms_StinkFree_Detergent_Sample

Take the 2Toms #StinkFreeSummer Challenge and see for yourself just how well 2Toms StinkFree Detergent works!

Click here to get your sample

NOTE:  Samples are limited to one per household. Available only while supplies last. Limited supply is available. Unfortunately, we cannot ship outside of the US.

 

Stinky Shoes & Gear?  Try 2Toms Stink Free Spray!

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2Toms® StinkFree® Spray is guaranteed to remove, not mask, odors caused by sweat left in your shoes, boots, gear, gym bags, pads/guards, gloves, lockers, etc.  Our technically advanced formula cleans the pores that trap the odor in shoes and gear.  Stink Free Spray has no perfume in it’s formula, therefore it leaves behind no smell once dry.

StinkFree Spray is safe to use on canvas, leather, satin, and denim and shoes.

Can’t wash it?  Need a quick fix?  Stink Free Spray is guaranteed to remove odors in shoes and gear including:
Hockey & lacrosse pads, Shin Guards, Shoes, Hiking Boots, Running Shoes, Cleats, Camping gear, Backpacks, Hydration Packs, Motorcycle Gear, Yoga Mats, Towels, Uniforms, and much more!  100% Guaranteed!

Learn More

 

 

Read what others are saying:

I’ve saved a fortune on clothes & bags using this stuff! — read more

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#RunChat: Tweet to Win 2Toms

2Toms Products

Win ALL of these amazing 2Toms products!

Just:

1. Follow us @2Toms and @MediDyne on Twitter

2. Tweet: Blister & Chafing Prevention 100% GUARANTEED!      #RunChat

And you’ll be entered to win!

Winners will be announced on Sunday, May 17 on #RunChat

Read what others are saying about 2Toms

IT Band Syndrome: Relief and Prevention

Upper Leg Pain ExercisesRecent Studies on IT Band Syndrome (ITBS):
A Look at Hip and Knee Mechanics

Illiotibial band syndrome (IT Band Syndrome / ITBS) is one of the leading causes of pain in athletes whose sports involve running.  The estimated incidence rate for athletes is believed to be between 5% and 14%.

Traditionally, believed to be an overuse injury, IT Band Syndrome is often described as being caused by friction or rubbing of the  iliotibial band (ITB) over the lower part of the femur as the knee extends and flexes. Sufferers of ITBS typically experience pain along the outside of the knee joint.  This pain is sometimes accompanied by a clicking sensation which is the result of the IT band tightening and snapping across the joint during physical activity.  ITBS usually starts with tightness, and untreated, can become very painful.  Pain from ITBS is typically experienced on the outside of the knee or lower thigh and can be made worse by activities like climbing up and down stairs, getting out of a car, or running up or down hills.  A person with ITBS may also feel tenderness in the knee tissue when applying pressure.

It’s believed then that the continual rubbing of the IT band over the outside of the femur may cause swelling, pain or a stinging sensation on the outside of the knee.  Recent studies, however, have focused on the frontal and transverse plan mechanics of the knee and lower extremity, suggesting that atypical hip and knee mechanics are the primary factors in development of ITBS.

Studies comparing runners with IT Band Syndrome to healthy runners found that the IT Band Syndrome group exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee internal rotation than the control group, leading researcher to reconsider the role of hip and knee in running mechanics. Subsequent studies have focused on the importance of running mechanics, providing evidence that gait re-training with step rate manipulation may be important for the treatment of IT Band Syndrome. The jury is still out on whether gait re-training is the key to curing ITBS, however, most reports did find that traditional strengthening of the hip abductors and flexibility exercises do contribute to a successful outcome.

ITBS Prevention & Remedies

Because the most notable symptom of IT Band Syndrome is typically swelling and pain on the outside of the knee, many runners mistakenly think they have a knee injury. It’s critical to rule out a knee problem or other serious injury. Ensuring proper gait as well as strength and flexibility of the hip abductors can be the most effective ways to prevent IT Band Syndrome.

IT Band Syndrome can become extremely painful and debilitating and can sideline a runner completely if not treated in its early stages.

Some risk factors for developing ITBS are:

  • Physical factors like stiffness of the IT Band tissue, unequal leg lengths, or extremely flat feet or high arches
  • A sudden increase in running routine intensity
  • Inadequate warm ups before or cool downs after running
  • Women are more likely to suffer from ITBS than men

ITBS Prevention

To prevent being sidelined with ITBS, it is best to prevent ITBS before it happens or to identify it in its very early stages.  Suggestions for preventing ITBS include:

  • core_comboRun on level surfaces – Running on flat surfaces can help avoid injury. If athletes are running on roads, it is important that they run on both sides of the road as many roads are higher in the center and slope to the sides. This slope can cause one foot to be lower than the other, resulting in the pelvis tilting to one side and stressing the IT band.
  • Avoid running on concrete surfaces – If running on a track, it is a good idea to change directions periodically.
  • Balance training – Runners should make sure that they include strength training and flexibility exercises in their workout routine and build in rest and recovery time into their training schedule.
  • Stretch and strengthen the muscles surrounding the IT band – Athletes can help prevent and treat ITBS by using the CoreStretch to strengthen weak hip and core muscles. The CoreStretch uses the body’s natural traction to safely and effectively stretch hamstrings, lower back, hips, piriformis, and glutes.
  • Only wear athletic shoes that are in good condition – If shoes are worn along the outside of the sole, they should be replaced.

ITBS Treatment

If an athlete begins to notice IT band pain, they should take steps to treat their ITBS before the pain increases.  Some steps to treat ITBS include:

Step 1:  Immediate Relief – Reduce Discomfort

  • Rest from training activities – Runners should decrease mileage or take a few days off if they feel pain on the outside of the knee.
  • IT Band Syndrome StrapUse a strap like the Cho-Pat IT Band Strap to compress the area and assist with ITBS healing. The Cho-Pat IT Band Strap provides Dynamic Pain Diffusion at the point of injury to alleviate the pain and discomfort of ITBS.
  • Ice massage – Freeze water in a small paper cup and rub the ice directly on the area of pain for about 15 minutes or until it gets numb. With ITBS, it is best to ice immediately after a run, but even icing it well at least once a day will help.
  • When you’re ready to go back to activity, cross train! Substitute other activities like swimming, cycling, and rowing while taking a break from running.

Step 2:  Long Term Healing:  Stretch, Strengthen & Massage

STRETCH

stretchrite_piriformis_stretchGiven the relevance of gait, hips positioning and knee rotation to ITBS, it is important to keep the posterior chain strong and flexible with a goal of improving alignment and restoring the workload back to the appropriate muscles.

Stretching exercises targeting the gluteus medius, piriformis, vascus lateralis, gastroc and soleus will help to ensure flexibility along the posterior chain.

The patented StretchRite features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively.

STRENGTHEN
Strengthening exercises include focus on the hip abductors, which can include: lateral leg raises, clamshells, hip thrusts, and side
steps/shuffle.

MASSAGE

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Medi-Dyne’s Advanced ITBS Solution available at the Medi-Dyne store.

advanced_ITBand_Solution Medi-Dyne

Runner’s Knee: Immediate Relief & Long-Term Healing

Runner’s Knee

Medi-Dyne_Knee_Pain_SolutionsRunners knee or patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the term used for non-specific pain that involves pain behind or around the kneecap, pain when you bend the knee, especially when walking, squatting, kneeling, running, or getting up from a chair and in some cases, pain that’s worse when walking downstairs or downhill. Pain can be sharp and sudden or dull and chronic. Not just found in runners, this syndrome is one of the most widely diagnosed in individual whose work or activities involve significant running or knee bending.

Functional risk factors for Runner’s Knee can include:
• Over use
• Prior injury
• Biomechanics
• Overpronation

Reducing the Pain of Runner’s Knee

An extremely common condition, a diagnosis of Runner’s Knee (PFPS) covers a range of usually vague symptoms of pain ‘in’, ‘under’ or ‘behind’ the kneecap. While there is no consensus on exactly what causes PFPS, a recent study in Medicine & Science in Sports &
Exercise found hip weakness and instability to be a contributing factor.  Additional research supports initial rest, minimizing impact, and
stretching and strengthening the supporting muscles can reduce pain. In the case of runner’s knee, research shows positive results from
introducing routines focused on glute, hip flexor/extensor and quad strength as well as hamstring and hip flexibility.

Individual experiencing early stages of Runner’s Knee pain can take steps to provide immediate relief and long-term healing.

Step 1:  Immediate Relief – Reduce DiscomfortCho-Pat_Origina_Knee_Strap_Runners_knee

For reducing the pain of Runner’s Knee, after initial rest, reducing discomfort during activity becomes an important aspect of recovery.
Cho-Pat’s® Original Knee Strap™ stabilizes and tightens up on the kneecap mechanism by applying pressure upon the patellar tendon below the kneecap. For many suffering from Runner’s Knee, this compression reduces or eliminates inflammation and helps prevent knees from giving out while still allowing full mobility.

Cho-Pat_Dynamic_Knee_Compression_SleeveFor others looking for greater coverage and support, compression sleeves like the Cho-Pat® Dynamic Knee Compression Sleeve™ provides light-weight support-oriented compression in a sleeve that both stabilizes the knee and reduces the inflammation caused by Runner’s Knee.

Step 2:  Long-Term Healing – Stretch, Strengthen & Massage

STRETCH AND STRENGTHEN

StretchRite for Runners KneeFor Runner’s Knee, stretching exercises targeting the gluteus medius, piriformis, hamstrings, and quads will help to ensure flexibility along the posterior chain are important.

The patented StretchRite® features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively. Six ergonomically-shaped handgrips offer a comfortable non-cinching hold and make it simple to adjust tension during the stretch. The handgrips also serve as visual feedback helping athletes safely stretch and monitor their progress.

Strengthening exercises should include focus on the hip abductors.
1. TFL/Glutes (lying side leg lifts, resisted side steps; glute bridge)
2. External Rotators (lying clam raise)
3. Quadriceps (straight leg lifts)
MASSAGE
RangeRoller_ITBS_SolutionFor Runner’s Knee, massage and myofacial release can often relieve muscle tension and create tissue mobility contributing significantly towards increasing flexibility. RangeRoller®’s unique design allow you to use both the TriggerTreads™ for increasing circulation as well as the end of the RangeRoller handle for releasing trigger points. For increased flexibility, circulation and performance consider massaging the:
• Tensor Fasciae Latae (TFL – at the bending point of the hip)
• Vascus lateralis (outside quad)
• Glutes

 

 

Medi-Dyne’s Advanced Runner’s Knee Solution available at the Medi-Dyne store.

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