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Posts Tagged ‘running shin splints’

Let the Training (but not the pain) Begin

Welcome to Craig’s Corner: Running, Stretching, and Training Tips from Craig.

Craig DiGiovanni. VP of Sales & Marketing, Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products. Avid Runner. Wannabe Marathoner.

Now that I’m over 40, being healthy is much harder than it used to be.   I used to think it was cliché but now that I’m living it I get it.  There’s no time for pain or injuries, especially if it impacts my “day jobs” (father, husband, repairman, chauffeur, business person…).  You may be able to relate.

That is where my passion for prevention, and taking that pain away comes into play!

I mentioned my New Year’s Resolution of running a marathon in an earlier post.   Did I mention that I’ve dragged my wife along for the ride?  We decided to train for a half marathon first and then continue to build towards running a full marathon this spring.  It has been a lot of fun so far.   I highly recommend a book that my sister-in-law referred us to, The Non-Runner’s Marathon Trainer by David Whitsett, Forrest Dolgener and Tanjala Kole. It’s done a great job of breaking down the whole process of training for a marathon, giving you a plan, and providing encouragement.

Professionally and personally, I understand the many challenges running presents to the body (especially as you get older and as you add more mileage)!  I’ve always appreciated and used the ProStretch Plus, but maybe not as consistently as I should have.  As I continue the journey of marathon training, I am beginning to completely understand just how effective the ProStretch Plus is for not only decreasing pain, but also preventing pain from happening in the first place.

What I personally love about all of the ProStretch products is that they are simple and THEY WORK!  The first time I brought one home, my wife laughed at it, but of course that was short lived.  The laughing stopped and the “oo-ing and ah-ing” started right after she used it for the first time.   The ProStretch is one of those products where you realize the benefits it offers once you use it.   You can feel it working instantly and it feels good!

Lately, I’ve had a lot of “experience” with what we call the interconnective chain of the lower leg.  This interconnective chain starts with the calf, goes down to the Achilles tendon, and connects to the calcaneous (heel) bone and the plantar fasciia.  The calf muscles have to work hard when you’re doing something as simple as walking, but they work even harder when you are running, jumping, stopping and starting.  In fact, I’ve read that the second hardest working group of muscles we have in our whole body is our calves.   Because the calf muscles have to work so hard, they are also susceptible to overuse and injury.

I first started using the ProStretch to combat shin splints and the beginning symptoms of Plantar fasciitis.   After I began experiencing these symptoms, I was doing a long warm up and some basic stretching before I ran, and then pro-longed stretches (for 30 – 60 seconds per repetition) after I ran.   Adding ProStretch exercises into my warm up and cool down gave me immediate results. I experienced immediate relief, and over 4 weeks total healing.

The ProStretch and now the new and improved ProStretch Plus, are simply the best devices for stretching the calf muscles and the entire interconnective chain of the lower leg. Next week, more to come on injuries of the lower leg.

Thanks for your interest in our products.  We love to hear from “users” so please leave us a comment and let us know what pain or injury you are suffering from.

Shin Splints in Runners

If you are a runner, there is a very good chance that you have experienced shin pain.  The number one cause of shin pain in runners is shin splints. Athletes who are in the early stages of shin splints usually experience pain when their runs first begin, but then the pain tends to disappear as their run continues. It is common for their shin pain to return after exercise or the following morning.  If the condition remains untreated and worsens, the athlete will find that they experience shin pain more often than not.

The term shin splints refers to pain along the large bone on the front of your leg, called your shinbone or tibia. The pain results from an overload on the shinbone and the connective tissue that attaches your muscles to the bone. People with shin splints often complain of mild swelling, soreness, or pain along the inner part of their lower leg or at their shin bone.

What causes shin splints?

  • Incorrect or inappropriate training methods.  Abrupt changes in the intensity, frequency or duration of training can be a factor in the onset of shin splints.
  • Muscular imbalances or lack of flexibility which lead to muscle weakness and instability.  Shin splints can be the result when your body over-compensates for this.
  • Training excessively on hard surfaces.  Concrete is very hard on the body and running predominantly on it could result in shin splints.

How do I treat and prevent shin splints?

  • Rest – Depending upon the severity, it may be necessary to completely stop running for a period of time.
  • Support Your Arches – Arch supports in every day shoes can help cushion and disperse stress on your shinbones, providing immediate pain relief for existing shin splints and added support and padding that help to prevent them.
  • Increase Flexibility in Your Calf Muscles – Your calves play a large role in the health of your shins.  Stretching your calves daily and increasing your calf flexibility can help you reduce your risk of muscle imbalance injury.
  • Strengthen the Opposition – Adding strength training to your flexibility exercises is a good way to work all of the supporting muscles required for proper muscle balance.

Icing can help the pain

Ice Dipping– Fill up your tub half full with water, add frozen water bottles or a bag of ice to get the water ICE COLD.  Submerge your lower leg into the ice water all the way to your knees.  Hold it in there for 10 seconds, walk around, and wait at least 5 minutes and then repeat the process 3-5 times.

Ice Massage – Fill small paper cups with water and freeze. Use one of the paper cups to massage the exposed ice into the most painful areas of your shins for a minimum of 5 minutes. Make sure you do not let the ice sit on one spot for too long.
For more information on shin splint pain solutions or to purchase shin splint treatments visit www.medi-dyne.com.