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Posts Tagged ‘RangeRoller’

RangeRoller Sore Muscles After Tough Practices

Running with Kids covers using the RangeRoller on sore muscles for tissue massage after tough runs or training, and even after taekwando practices for IT Bands and tight calves.

Gear Review – Tissue Massage with RangeRoller

RangeRoller CalvesWe have incorporated Medi-Dyne’s Pro Stretch Plus into our cool down and stretching routine after runs (read my review here). But there is another Medi-Dyne tool in our toolkit, the original Range Roller, that has become just as important after strenuous workouts. The Range Roller enables soft tissue massages and accelerates the healing and recovery process.

My older son, who runs high school cross country and track, used a hard foam roller for tissue massages, and I had considered buying one. I opted for the Range Roller for several reasons, including deeper tissue massage, more versatile applications with the tool, and very portable (throw it into a gym bag or backpack). He has since converted to the Range Roller.

RangeRoller IT BandsRecognizing the importance of stretching and massaging, my younger son has been using the Range Roller after runs as well, but opened our eyes when he asked for the Range Roller after his Taekwondo 2nd degree Black Belt test (read about this 90 minute test that requires nearly 1,000 hours of preparation). We now use the Range Roller after runs (example: helps disipate lactic acid after threshold and anaerobic track workouts by improving blood circulation to muscles) and after Taekwondo practice (example: helps reduce soreness and repair tissue after Taekwondo sparring session by improving blood circulation to tissue).

What we like:

RangeRoller’s Unique Design

  • The original Range Roller measures 19 inches long and contains 6 narrow, deep rollers alternating with 7 wider, shallow rollers that turn freely as the Range Roller is gently and firmly rolled to massage tissue.
  • The tool is held with foam handles on both ends and flexes slightly as pressure is applied.
  • It is portable (bring along to a track workout, martial arts practice, or fitness center) and easy to store.
  • A smaller (16 inch) and larger (25 inch) version is also available.
  • The Range Roller can be ordered in your favorite color combinations (think sports teams!)

RangeRoller’s Materials and Quality

  • The Range Roller is manufactured of high quality plastic and dense foam, and can be gently washed with mild soap.
  • We are impressed with the overall quality of the Range Roller (design, materials, and workmanship) and expect to use it daily for many years to come.

RangeRoller’s Affordable Price

  • The Range Roller costs $25 at Medi-Dyne.com.
  • Less expensive (and more versatile) than foam rollers, and a fraction of the cost of sports massages!

Welcome to the Medi-Dyne Family Cho-Pat

Cho-Pat, a Welcome Addition

At Medi-Dyne we’re excited to be able to offer you a comprehensive selection of pain relief and prevention solutions that deliver relief, support, and performance improvement for the entire length of your body’s interconnective chain of muscles, joints, tendons, and ligaments.

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We look forward to providing you with innovative, easy-to-use solutions that really work! For more information visit www.medi-dyne.com, or connect with us @MediDyne.

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RangeRoller: Hard to Reach Muscles

Chuck Swanson is a runner/athlete born and raised in Lincoln, Nebraska.   He runs a couple marathons and 3-6 road races every year, and he intends to run an ultra marathon (50 miles) in the near future.  Chuck’s training includes 30-60 miles of running each week, increasing during peak training times.

As a runner, Chuck has suffered many aches and pains. His list includes fighting issues with; illiotibial band syndrome (ITBS or IT Band Syndrome), plantar fasciitis, calf strains and tight calf muscles, as well as Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) issues, to name a few. Chuck was given the opportunity to use and review the RangeRoller, for deep tissue massage therapy. Here is what Chuck said;

“I like the RangeRoller’s ability to help get those sore spots that need a little ‘TLC’.  The RangeRoller is easy to use and is easy to take to races, both close and far away.  It is easily cleaned up and is compact and effective.

massage stick for calf pain tight calvesI use the RangeRoller to get to those spots that my foam roller can’t reach or get to.  It is a great item to help with this because of the raised pieces [Trigger Treads] that allow for a more ART [Active Release Technique] type therapy.  I am able to get out the soreness and muscle trauma spots with ease.  I also use the RangeRoller at races to help get my muscles loose and warmed up before my races, in addition to dynamic stretches and jogging/running.

I use the RangeRoller at home, in my car (close local races), and at the hotel/motel (farther destination type races).  Outside or inside the product is easy to use, and can be used anywhere you want really.

RangeRoller massage for foot painThe RangeRoller can sometimes pull the hair out of my legs when I use it, but the rewards far exceed the pain!

This product is unique and I didn’t really have anything similar to it.  I use a foam roller and the RangeRoller together because they work similar but are great compliments to one another.  I was in the market and ready to purchase The Stick and saw a tweet that intervened, the rest is history.  I am glad I was able to get the RangeRoller to try and am definitely a fan.

illiotibial band massage rollerI would definitely recommend this product to a friend.  I would recommend it because I have ZERO doubts that it has helped me go through my first training cycle for a marathon injury free.  I have always encountered some type of injury that has caused me to miss at least a week of training in every marathon I have run (8 total).  This training cycle has been different and I have honestly never felt better health wise.

The RangeRoller has helped with my chronic ITBS issues and calf issues.  Paired with my foam roller and Bio Freeze, it works hand in hand with getting me out to train and doing it injury free. “

For more information on deep tissue massage therapy or to purchase the RangeRoller visit www.medi-dyne.com.

Transitioning to Minimalist Running

This is the story of how Kabri became a runner, and the tricks and tools she used along the way. Read more about her running story in Part 1 and Part 2.

Part 3: Transitioning to Minimalist Running

Using Medi-Dyne during the transition to minimalist running.

Three years ago, I began training for my very first half marathon. Little did I know that my journey of becoming a “runner” was just beginning.

If you’re just tuning in, I am an advocate of stretching and massage for runners. How do I know all of the benefits of stretching and massage now? And why didn’t I incorporate these great Medi-Dyne products into my recovery and maintenance three years ago?

Well besides the fact that hindsight is always 20-20, I was recently able to put my newly-acquired ProStretch Plus and RangeRoller tools to the test while I was transitioning back to minimalist running. You see, the popular “barefoot” trend requires a runner to build up their foot, ankle and knee muscles. You must build up your muscles and expose them to the shock and stresses that a cushioned sneaker may have absorbed in the past. This transition takes time and patience to avoid injury, and is similar in many ways to the muscle development that takes place while trail running.

After moving to San Francisco over a year ago, I transitioned from running on mostly trails to road running. The city’s hills kept my leg muscles strengthened, but I was quickly losing the strong muscular protection I had built up around my knee and ankle joints.  In order to maintain the muscular support my joints had worked so hard to establish, I decided that I would slowly transition into a pair of popular “barefoot” style shoes. On my first runs I found that first, I absolutely loved being able to feel the road under the soles of my feet—my toes having to grab for the road. Secondly, by landing on the forefront of my feet, my calves were tightening up as quickly and as painfully as when I initially started trail running.

To promote healthy muscle growth and alleviate the soreness, I would do a concentrated stretching routine with my ProStretch Plus after each run, focusing on not only my calves, but also my Achilles tendons. I found that this newly experienced “tightness” would travel down my Achilles and into the bottom of my feet. By simply adjusting the angle and wedge on my ProStretch Plus, I was able to increase the flexibility of not only my calves and hamstrings, but also my arches and toes.

In short, I believe that injury prevention and muscle growth can be facilitated by the proper stretching of overly-tight muscles and by “combing” out the knots that develop in damaged muscle fibers, promoting renewed blood flow and muscle repair. I have found the ProStretch Plus and RangeRoller to be my two key tools for ongoing maintenance in my trail and minimalist road running interests. This year I look forward to setting a new road marathon PR at the Oakland and San Francisco Marathons! Finish strong!

For more information on the ProStretch Plus or RangeRoller visit www.medi-dyne.com.

The Pains of Trail Running

This is the story of how Kabri became a runner, and the tricks and tools she used along the way. Read more about her running story in Part 1.

Part 2: The Pains of Trail Running

Kabri uses ProStretch Plus and RangeRoller for trail running pain prevention.

Three years ago I began training for my very first half marathon. Little did I know, my journey of becoming a “runner” was just beginning.

If you’re just tuning in I’m Kabri, newly self-professed trail runner! For the next year I challenged myself, running and hiking distances from 10k to 50k on the trails in the Bay Area. It took quite a while for my body to adapt to the trails and I believe that many of my challenges would have been resolved or largely alleviated if I had had a ProStretch Plus back then. My lower calves would become so tight during and after my runs that they would cramp. My feet would feel “asleep” with the loss of blood flow through my calves. It was very painful. The ProStretchPlus is ideal for maintaining and restoring flexibility to these tight muscles, and is especially good at focusing the stretch along your inner or outer calf muscles, as needed.

Whether you are a strong road runner, or are completely new to running, running on trails places stresses on the ankle, leg and knee muscles that are not often used. These stabilizer muscles allow your feet to spring over rocks and avoid unearthed roots while streaming down a single-track trail system under your favorite tree canopy. After your first trail run you’re likely to be very tight in your calf muscles and hamstrings as these muscles will have been highly engaged as you picked the most stable path along river beds and steep inclines.

Along with the increased flexibility that I would have achieved by properly stretching my calves and hamstrings, I realize how helpful the RangeRoller would have been to post-run recovery. The RangeRoller provides a deep tissue massage that allows my muscles to repair themselves by breaking up the knotted muscle fibers and allowing fresh blood back into the damaged space.

Climbing and descending hills and mountains goes hand-in-hand with trail running; both the uphill and downhill portions of a run, especially, take a toll on your quads. After my long training runs, I would make an appointment with a masseuse, knowing that large knots would form in my quad muscles that could not be released with stretching alone.  The RangeRoller essentially provides the same service, but is much more convenient. I’ll warn you now – whether by masseuse or RangeRoller – tackling knotted muscles by compressing and stretching the damaged fibers is a painful but rewarding process!

 

For more information on the ProStretch Plus or RangeRoller visit www.medi-dyne.com.

The Importance of Running Form

Craig’s Corner: Form over function or function over form?

Craig DiGiovanni. VP of Sales & Marketing, Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products. Avid Runner. Wannabe Marathoner.

Like any moving object, variables change at different speeds. For example, when trying to turn a car, you can turn in a smaller radius at lower speeds than you can at higher speeds. Or, the faster you are going, the longer and farther it takes to stop.  So it is with running; variables change with the increase and decrease of speed.   I have learned this first hand during my training for the OKC Memorial Marathon.

During the week, I have been running my shorter distances at a much faster tempo than during my long runs on the weekend. What I have noticed is that I am experiencing tightness in different parts of my body, based on the speed at which I run.

At the faster speeds my attention is more on my breathing and overall feeling of being tired, and maybe a little on the tightness in my calves. I deal with each of these issues easily, by first stopping my run temporarily so I can catch my breath….I know rocket science, right?  And second, for my tight calves; I use my Tuli’s heel cups to prevent most of the shock that causes the Achilles and then calf tightness, and also I do some simple ProStretch Plus stretching post run and throughout the day. These latter techniques are such simple measures, but within a day or two the tightness goes away.

Running form and the interconnective chain of the legs.

When I run at slower speeds during the longer mileage in my training, my attention seems to switch to the arches of my feet and to my quadriceps. At first this confused me because I wasn’t feeling excessively tired during my long runs, more “heavy” than tired. The more I thought about it though, the more I realized that at slower speeds I was changing the way that I ran.   My running form at slower speeds was putting more pressure on my arches and was also forcing my quadriceps to engage more.   Essentially, my running form was changing the way the tendons and muscles, that make up the interconnective chain of my legs, were working together.  My form was driving function.

The solution to my dilemma was to use more arch support on my slower runs and also roll out and stretch my quads really well after my run.   Once I supported my arches and also built up my quads my “attention” areas all but went away.

So, the next time you start having to pay some attention to a problem area consider all the variables, not only around that area, but also those that are interconnected.   Like me, you might find the pain in one place is caused by a situation in another place.

For more information on techniques and tools that help with those problem areas visit www.medi-dyne.com.

Make the Most of Your 13.1

Craig DiGiovanni. VP of Sales & Marketing, Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products. Avid Runner. Wannabe Marathoner.

I thought I knew what to expect on my first half marathon (13.1 miles), but quickly realized that I was wrong.   In training for the Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon, I had finally reached the half way mark: 13 miles. I decided to celebrate this milestone by running an official half marathon, and signed up for the Fort Worth Cowtown. The good news is the race turned out to be a far better experience than I expected, but I definitely learned some things that I feel are worth sharing.

Here are some before, during and after tips for making the most of your 13.1 half marathon.

Before the race

  1. Get there early: I got to the race early and was glad.  I didn’t stress about parking, had plenty of time to use the restroom and enjoy the atmosphere.
  2. Go to the bathroom: Using the restroom before the race is a must.
  3. Do what is routine: As per my usual morning runs, I drank a little but didn’t eat before the race. I was glad I didn’t, butterflies were enough for my stomach.
  4. Plan ahead or bring a buddy: Depending on weather, having someone to hand your clothes off to before the race starts is a nice bonus.  Otherwise, you are either cold while you’re waiting in the corals (because you don’t have them) or you are warm but then have to leave them at the start, and go on a crusade to find them after the race.

During the race

  1. Let ‘er rip: My adrenaline must have been way up, because my split times were about the same as my 5K and I held steady the whole race.   I was cautious the whole race about that, but next time I won’t be, and I will be more willing to push my times.
    Practice makes perfect: Running and drinking are an art.   I would try that before the race.   How you get the water in your mouth without showering you and everyone around you, and then how you get it down without coughing…well, it took a little practice.   I am sure I provided a laugh or two for those on the sidelines!
  2. Find flat surfaces: Looking for flat parts of the road are a must if you are prone to shin splints.   It took me about 1 mile to realize that an extra step or two to the left or right to get off an angle in the road was worth it.   The crown of the road or closest to the edges seemed to work the best.   13.1 miles at an angle could be problematic.
  3. Send some thanks: There are so many incredible people volunteering and encouraging runners during races, I wish I would have thanked more of them along the way.  If you have the breath, thank them.
  4. Snack smart: Energy gels really seem to work.  I like Gu and Cliff products because they taste good and go down easy.   Also, find a product that doesn’t produce large fluctuations in your energy; big highs then deep lows.

After the race

  1. Enjoy the moment: Give yourself time to take it all in, don’t rush out to leave so you can enjoy the moment.   I had to high tail it out of there for life’s next event, but wish I could have just hung out a few more minutes to enjoy the post race food and activities, and to let the accomplishment sink in.
  2. Run for fun:  I ran the race just to finish and I am glad that I did. I think it is great to measure your time, but if you aren’t enjoying the people, the scenery and the accomplishment, then it won’t last very long and won’t be much fun.
  3. Bring along recovery tools: If you have a roller, make sure you have it because you will surely need it.  Once you are stagnant your muscles will begin to tighten up. Having tools at the race (in your car, etc) to help stretch and loosen your muscles will help decrease future soreness. I of course am a RangeRoller guy, a must for any post race recovery.

That was my race experience.   Hope these tips help to prepare you for your next race. Let us know if there are any race tips that you swear by, leave us a comment. I hope you enjoy your 13.1!

Medi-Dyne Launches the “Weekly Buzz”

We are excited to announce that we will begin publishing stories, feedback, and reviews that have been contributed to us by Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products users.

This summer we set out to obtain knowledge on how medical professionals and athletes view and use Medi-Dyne products such as the new ProStretch Plus and RangeRoller. We sought feedback in the form of question and answer responses, photos, video or simply comments and quotes on how individuals felt and valued the products.  Needless to say we learned a lot.

A great thing about Medi-Dyne is that we are always looking for new ways to use our products; new rehabilitative exercises or even new poses that help reach different areas within an exercise, new ways to dynamically stretch or strengthen, and new situations or injuries that our products help rehabilitate or prevent.  We are pleased to present these responses in the hopes that you will find some benefit in learning how the ProStretch Plus, RangeRoller, and additional products are being used by other individuals and industry professionals.

Many of our contributors treat or have suffered from the following pain and injuries; Heel pain, Plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, Tight calves or calf pain, Shin splints, Tight hamstrings, or IT band syndrome.

Participants have used Medi-Dyne products to help rehabilitate a current injury, prevent pain and enhance performance, prepare for an event or training, etc. We are sincerely grateful for their contributions, and we look forward to sharing their stories and feedback with you.

If you would like to contribute a review, story, or feedback for our Weekly Buzz, please email connect@medi-dyne.com or visit medi-dyne.com for more information.

 

And the Champions Are…

After two months of preparation, a grueling week of voting, and a week of pure suspense; it is finally time to announce the Champions of our “Building a Champion” – Medi-Dyne’s National Video Contest!

Athletic Trainers and Athletic Training students from across the nation submitted creative videos, which included Medi-Dyne’s ProStretch Plus or RangeRoller, to participate in the video contest. Some videos were informative, some playful, but all highlighted the need for stretching and massage equipment throughout athletics and athletic training. The videos that received the top three-most votes were awarded a donation for their school’s Athletic Training program.

Steve Dippel and students from the Montclair State University Athletic Training Education Program highlight features of the ProStretch Plus, winning first place and taking home the Championship donation of $2,500

Congratulations to our first place Champions, the Redhawks from Montclair State University! The Montclair Athletic Training Education Program won a donation of $2,500 after receiving the most votes for their video, “MSU ATEP Demo of the ProStretch+ Sponsored by Medi-Dyne” . They creatively coined the line, “ProStretch Plus is a Must!” while highlighting key features of the ProStretch Plus, like it’s ability to offer maximum toe and plantar fascia stretch. The “MSU ATEP” students were awarded a Medi-Dyne.com gift certificate, for being the “Biggest Fans” during the video contest.

The race for second and third came down to the last 10 votes!

California Baptist University’s Athletic Training students clinched second place in the end. They won a donation of $1,000 and a Medi-Dyne gift certificate for their participation. Their video “Making Champions Erryday” uses both the RangeRoller and ProStretch Plus in injury prevention scenarios. Get glimpses of their training facilities and campus in their video entry.

Finally, third place goes to Willie and his team of Wildcats from Canton South High School in Ohio. “Medi-Dyne’s Range Roller Rescues Willie the Wildcat” came in as our third and final Championship video for the contest. The Canton South High School Wildcats will receive a donation of $500 for their third place victory, as well as a certificate for Medi-Dyne stretching, strengthening, and rehabilitation products. We look forward to seeing Willie’s victory dance.

Cue Queen’s “We are the Champions”

Thank you to everyone who participated and supported “Building a Champion” – Medi-Dyne’s National Video Contest. The video submissions we received were truly inspiring.  We are excited to award these donations to the following Athletic Training programs, who are continuing to build champions in their schools across the nation.

 “Champions do not become champions when they win the event, but in the hours, weeks, months and years they spend preparing for it. The victorious performance itself is merely the demonstration of their championship character” – T. Alan Armstrong