Start Shopping

Archive for the ‘Knee Pain’ Category

4 Top Causes of Knee Pain

Most Common Causes of Knee Pain

Sports Knee pain concept

Knee pain can be debilitating, but there are ways to treat it so you can become pain-free once again. You just need to know the underlying cause before you can get treatment for your discomfort. So take a look at the most common causes of knee pain, along with some effective treatment options that can get you on the road to recovery.

Meniscus Tear

Your knee contains a firm, flexible type of cartilage called a meniscus. When you injure this part of your knee, it’s called a meniscus tear. This is one of the most common types of knee injuries, especially among athletes who play sports like football, soccer, volleyball or any activity that requires you to quickly switch directions while running.

The symptoms of a meniscus tear include a pop when the injury occurs, followed by knee pain, swelling and difficulty either straightening or bending the leg. While a small meniscus tear may heal on its own with the help of some rest, ice and an elastic bandage, more severe tears often require knee surgery.

Ligament Injuries

Aside from cartilage, your knee also contains ligaments that connect the thigh bone to the bones in the lower leg. It’s common for athletes to tear or sprain the ligaments, especially the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL. This is another knee injury that may occur when you suddenly switch directions while running, which is why you might often hear about ACL injuries among famous football and basketball players.

Like the meniscus tear, you might notice a pop when you injure a ligament in your knee. It may be followed by pain, swelling, limited mobility and the inability to put any weight on it. The most important step for treating this knee injury is to let the area rest, along with applying ice to it and supporting it with an elastic bandage. Many people end up also needing either physical therapy or surgery to repair the ligament.

Arthritis

There are a few types of arthritis that affect the knee. The most common type is osteoarthritis, in which the cartilage in the knee is gradually worn down. This can lead to knee pain, swelling, stiffness and limited mobility. Another type is rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease that results in inflammation of the tissue near the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis is also a common cause of knee pain, and it occurs after you’ve injured your knee in some way and damaged the cartilage.

The symptoms of arthritis can make the knee swell, hurt, and feel stiff and hard to move. The treatment for this cause of knee pain depends on the type of arthritis and symptoms that are present. But it generally includes medication to reduce inflammation and pain, the use of knee braces and bandages, physical therapy, or surgery.

Fractures

If you were in a car accident, experienced a fall or had some other type of trauma done to your body, it’s possible that your knee pain is caused by a fracture of the knee bones. If the pain is severe and you cannot walk, you should talk to your doctor to find out if you’ve broken a bone in the knee, such as your kneecap.

If it turns out your knee is fractured, you will likely need a cast and crutches so the bone can heal over time. Eventually you should be able to get the cast off and start using a knee brace or compression sleeve to support the area when you walk.

In fact, you can often reduce knee pain of any kind by providing extra support with a knee strap or compression sleeve any time you plan to be active. Fortunately, there are lots of products on the market that can relieve your knee pain. Your doctor can advise you before you choose the right one.

Visit www.cho-pat.com to learn more about pain solutions for knee pain.

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/meniscustear#1

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/anterior-cruciate-ligament-acl-injuries-treatment-overview

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/physical-rehabilitation-for-acl-injuries

http://www.everydayhealth.com/pain-management/knee-pain/osteoarthritis-of-the-knee.aspx

http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/pain-management/tips/25-treatments-for-hip-knee-oa.php

http://www.medi-dyne.com/injury-treatment/knee-pain/

IT Band Syndrome: Relief and Prevention

Upper Leg Pain ExercisesRecent Studies on IT Band Syndrome (ITBS):
A Look at Hip and Knee Mechanics

Illiotibial band syndrome (IT Band Syndrome / ITBS) is one of the leading causes of pain in athletes whose sports involve running.  The estimated incidence rate for athletes is believed to be between 5% and 14%.

Traditionally, believed to be an overuse injury, IT Band Syndrome is often described as being caused by friction or rubbing of the  iliotibial band (ITB) over the lower part of the femur as the knee extends and flexes. Sufferers of ITBS typically experience pain along the outside of the knee joint.  This pain is sometimes accompanied by a clicking sensation which is the result of the IT band tightening and snapping across the joint during physical activity.  ITBS usually starts with tightness, and untreated, can become very painful.  Pain from ITBS is typically experienced on the outside of the knee or lower thigh and can be made worse by activities like climbing up and down stairs, getting out of a car, or running up or down hills.  A person with ITBS may also feel tenderness in the knee tissue when applying pressure.

It’s believed then that the continual rubbing of the IT band over the outside of the femur may cause swelling, pain or a stinging sensation on the outside of the knee.  Recent studies, however, have focused on the frontal and transverse plan mechanics of the knee and lower extremity, suggesting that atypical hip and knee mechanics are the primary factors in development of ITBS.

Studies comparing runners with IT Band Syndrome to healthy runners found that the IT Band Syndrome group exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee internal rotation than the control group, leading researcher to reconsider the role of hip and knee in running mechanics. Subsequent studies have focused on the importance of running mechanics, providing evidence that gait re-training with step rate manipulation may be important for the treatment of IT Band Syndrome. The jury is still out on whether gait re-training is the key to curing ITBS, however, most reports did find that traditional strengthening of the hip abductors and flexibility exercises do contribute to a successful outcome.

ITBS Prevention & Remedies

Because the most notable symptom of IT Band Syndrome is typically swelling and pain on the outside of the knee, many runners mistakenly think they have a knee injury. It’s critical to rule out a knee problem or other serious injury. Ensuring proper gait as well as strength and flexibility of the hip abductors can be the most effective ways to prevent IT Band Syndrome.

IT Band Syndrome can become extremely painful and debilitating and can sideline a runner completely if not treated in its early stages.

Some risk factors for developing ITBS are:

  • Physical factors like stiffness of the IT Band tissue, unequal leg lengths, or extremely flat feet or high arches
  • A sudden increase in running routine intensity
  • Inadequate warm ups before or cool downs after running
  • Women are more likely to suffer from ITBS than men

ITBS Prevention

To prevent being sidelined with ITBS, it is best to prevent ITBS before it happens or to identify it in its very early stages.  Suggestions for preventing ITBS include:

  • core_comboRun on level surfaces – Running on flat surfaces can help avoid injury. If athletes are running on roads, it is important that they run on both sides of the road as many roads are higher in the center and slope to the sides. This slope can cause one foot to be lower than the other, resulting in the pelvis tilting to one side and stressing the IT band.
  • Avoid running on concrete surfaces – If running on a track, it is a good idea to change directions periodically.
  • Balance training – Runners should make sure that they include strength training and flexibility exercises in their workout routine and build in rest and recovery time into their training schedule.
  • Stretch and strengthen the muscles surrounding the IT band – Athletes can help prevent and treat ITBS by using the CoreStretch to strengthen weak hip and core muscles. The CoreStretch uses the body’s natural traction to safely and effectively stretch hamstrings, lower back, hips, piriformis, and glutes.
  • Only wear athletic shoes that are in good condition – If shoes are worn along the outside of the sole, they should be replaced.

ITBS Treatment

If an athlete begins to notice IT band pain, they should take steps to treat their ITBS before the pain increases.  Some steps to treat ITBS include:

Step 1:  Immediate Relief – Reduce Discomfort

  • Rest from training activities – Runners should decrease mileage or take a few days off if they feel pain on the outside of the knee.
  • IT Band Syndrome StrapUse a strap like the Cho-Pat IT Band Strap to compress the area and assist with ITBS healing. The Cho-Pat IT Band Strap provides Dynamic Pain Diffusion at the point of injury to alleviate the pain and discomfort of ITBS.
  • Ice massage – Freeze water in a small paper cup and rub the ice directly on the area of pain for about 15 minutes or until it gets numb. With ITBS, it is best to ice immediately after a run, but even icing it well at least once a day will help.
  • When you’re ready to go back to activity, cross train! Substitute other activities like swimming, cycling, and rowing while taking a break from running.

Step 2:  Long Term Healing:  Stretch, Strengthen & Massage

STRETCH

stretchrite_piriformis_stretchGiven the relevance of gait, hips positioning and knee rotation to ITBS, it is important to keep the posterior chain strong and flexible with a goal of improving alignment and restoring the workload back to the appropriate muscles.

Stretching exercises targeting the gluteus medius, piriformis, vascus lateralis, gastroc and soleus will help to ensure flexibility along the posterior chain.

The patented StretchRite features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively.

STRENGTHEN
Strengthening exercises include focus on the hip abductors, which can include: lateral leg raises, clamshells, hip thrusts, and side
steps/shuffle.

MASSAGE

RangeRoller_ITBS_Solution

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medi-Dyne’s Advanced ITBS Solution available at the Medi-Dyne store.

advanced_ITBand_Solution Medi-Dyne

Runner’s Knee: Immediate Relief & Long-Term Healing

Runner’s Knee

Medi-Dyne_Knee_Pain_SolutionsRunners knee or patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the term used for non-specific pain that involves pain behind or around the kneecap, pain when you bend the knee, especially when walking, squatting, kneeling, running, or getting up from a chair and in some cases, pain that’s worse when walking downstairs or downhill. Pain can be sharp and sudden or dull and chronic. Not just found in runners, this syndrome is one of the most widely diagnosed in individual whose work or activities involve significant running or knee bending.

Functional risk factors for Runner’s Knee can include:
• Over use
• Prior injury
• Biomechanics
• Overpronation

Reducing the Pain of Runner’s Knee

An extremely common condition, a diagnosis of Runner’s Knee (PFPS) covers a range of usually vague symptoms of pain ‘in’, ‘under’ or ‘behind’ the kneecap. While there is no consensus on exactly what causes PFPS, a recent study in Medicine & Science in Sports &
Exercise found hip weakness and instability to be a contributing factor.  Additional research supports initial rest, minimizing impact, and
stretching and strengthening the supporting muscles can reduce pain. In the case of runner’s knee, research shows positive results from
introducing routines focused on glute, hip flexor/extensor and quad strength as well as hamstring and hip flexibility.

Individual experiencing early stages of Runner’s Knee pain can take steps to provide immediate relief and long-term healing.

Step 1:  Immediate Relief – Reduce DiscomfortCho-Pat_Origina_Knee_Strap_Runners_knee

For reducing the pain of Runner’s Knee, after initial rest, reducing discomfort during activity becomes an important aspect of recovery.
Cho-Pat’s® Original Knee Strap™ stabilizes and tightens up on the kneecap mechanism by applying pressure upon the patellar tendon below the kneecap. For many suffering from Runner’s Knee, this compression reduces or eliminates inflammation and helps prevent knees from giving out while still allowing full mobility.

Cho-Pat_Dynamic_Knee_Compression_SleeveFor others looking for greater coverage and support, compression sleeves like the Cho-Pat® Dynamic Knee Compression Sleeve™ provides light-weight support-oriented compression in a sleeve that both stabilizes the knee and reduces the inflammation caused by Runner’s Knee.

Step 2:  Long-Term Healing – Stretch, Strengthen & Massage

STRETCH AND STRENGTHEN

StretchRite for Runners KneeFor Runner’s Knee, stretching exercises targeting the gluteus medius, piriformis, hamstrings, and quads will help to ensure flexibility along the posterior chain are important.

The patented StretchRite® features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively. Six ergonomically-shaped handgrips offer a comfortable non-cinching hold and make it simple to adjust tension during the stretch. The handgrips also serve as visual feedback helping athletes safely stretch and monitor their progress.

Strengthening exercises should include focus on the hip abductors.
1. TFL/Glutes (lying side leg lifts, resisted side steps; glute bridge)
2. External Rotators (lying clam raise)
3. Quadriceps (straight leg lifts)
MASSAGE
RangeRoller_ITBS_SolutionFor Runner’s Knee, massage and myofacial release can often relieve muscle tension and create tissue mobility contributing significantly towards increasing flexibility. RangeRoller®’s unique design allow you to use both the TriggerTreads™ for increasing circulation as well as the end of the RangeRoller handle for releasing trigger points. For increased flexibility, circulation and performance consider massaging the:
• Tensor Fasciae Latae (TFL – at the bending point of the hip)
• Vascus lateralis (outside quad)
• Glutes

 

 

Medi-Dyne’s Advanced Runner’s Knee Solution available at the Medi-Dyne store.

Medi-Dyne_Advanced_RunnersKnee_500-500x500

An Athlete’s Guide to Jumper’s Knee

Jumper’s knee can affect athletes in many sports.

Runner's Knee

Athletes who participate in sports in which they do a lot of jumping like basketball, volleyball, and long jump may experience a painful condition known as Jumper’s Knee.  Jumper’s knee, or patellar tendonitis, is pain in the tendon which attaches the knee cap (patella) to the top of the shin bone (tibia).  Jumper’s knee is typically an overuse injury caused by repetitive strain placed on the patellar or quadriceps tendon during jumping but can affect athletes in “non-jumping” sports as well.

Some of the risk factors that contribute to jumper’s knee are increased body weight, being bow-legged or knock-kneed, having an abnormally high or low kneecap, and having legs of unequal length.  Males are twice as likely as females to be afflicted by jumper’s knee.  An athlete who has tight leg muscles and reduced flexibility in the thighs and hamstrings can have a muscle imbalance which can cause jumper’s knee pain.  Other factors that can contribute to jumper’s knee are the use of steroids which often results in weaker muscles and tendons and being afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis which causes inflammation of the knee joint.

Jumper’s knee typically consists of pain at the bottom front of the kneecap over what is called the lower pole of the patella.  The bottom of the patella will be very tender when pressing in, and activities like jumping are painful.  An athlete suffering from jumper’s knee is likely to experience aching and stiffness after exercise and it is possible that the affected tendon may appear larger than the tendon on the unaffected side.

Jumper’s knee can be categorized into four grades of injury:

  • Grade 1: Pain is experienced in the patellar tendon after training only.
  • Grade 2: Pain is felt before and after training but eases up once the knee is warmed up.
  • Grade 3: Pain is experienced during training and limits athletic performance.
  • Grade 4: Pain is felt even during every day activities.

It is important to pay attention to knee pain.  Jumper’s knee may initially appear to be an annoying minor injury that is not very concerning.  As it may not be a debilitating injury, many athletes may continue to train and compete on it.  However, neglecting jumper’s knee can cause this minor knee pain to become chronic and difficult to treat.

Jumper’s Knee – Prevention

Ideally, athletes should prevent jumper’s knee pain before it starts.  Suggestions for preventing jumper’s knee include:

  • Athletes should pace themselves. It is important to schedule days off from training so the body can heal and regenerate.
  • Improve hip flexibility and mobility by using a tool like the CoreStretch. The CoreStretch allows tissues to elongate, stretch, and relax. The CoreStretch uses the body’s natural traction to provide a deep, effective stretch of the hips, hamstrings, glutes, and quads.
  • An athlete should avoid playing and practicing on hard surfaces when practical.
  • Wearing shoes designed for the sport and that are in good condition will help avoid injury.

If an athlete is experiencing early stages of Jumper’s Knee pain, they can usually treat themselves.  A more severe injury may require longer rest and could result in surgery.

Jumper’s Knee treatments includes:

1. Step 1:  Immediate Relief – Reduce Discomfort

  • Rest or adapt training to reduce impact and jumping activities.
  • Apply ice on a regular basis during the first 24 to 48 hours after experiencing pain and after any form of exercise.
  • Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee StrapWear a knee strap like the Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Strap to reduce pain of Jumper’s Knee and ease the strain on the tendon. The Dual Action Knee Strap delivers support both above and below the knee. This dual support provides Dynamic Pain Diffusion to reduce the amount of force that is placed on the knee, decrease the chance of misalignment or displacement, and improve tracking.
  • cho-pat_dynamicknee-500x500Use a compression sleeve like the Cho-Pat Dynamic Knee Compression Sleeve which combines warmth, compression, and reinforcement to help reduce pain and discomfort and promote healing.

2. Step 2:  Long Term Healing:  Stretch, Strengthen & Massage

Targeted muscles for healing and preventing Jumper’s Knee

• Gluteus medius
• Piriformis
• Psoas
• Hamstrings
• Quads
• Gastroc

StretchRiteStretching exercises targeting the gluteus medius, piriformis, hamstrings, and quads will help to
ensure flexibility along the posterior chain and can help to prevent future Jumper’s Knee issues.

The patented StretchRite® system features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively. Six ergonomically-shaped handgrips offer a comfortable non-cinching hold and make it simple to adjust tension during the stretch. The handgrips also serve as visual feedback helping athletes safely stretch and monitor their progress. The StretchRite offers a comfortable, more effective stretch which improves flexibility and promotes healing in the knee.

Successful strengthening programs for Jumper’s Knee have focused on gastroc & soleus muscles as well as proprioceptive training.

Massage and myofacial release can often relieve muscle tension and create tissue mobility contributing significantly towards increasing RangeRoller-2194flexibility and reducing the occurrence of Jumper’s Knee . RangeRoller®’s unique design allow you to use both the TriggerTreads™ for increasing circulation as well as the end of the RangeRoller handle for releasing trigger points.
For increased flexibility, circulation and performance consider massaging the:
• Tensor Fasciae Latae (TFL – at the bending point of the hip)
• Glutes
• Quads
• Gastroc & soleus

Spring Track Running Injuries

Foot Pain ExercisesSpring Track Running Injuries

Spring is here which means track season has started for thousands of students.  It also means that student athletes are at risk of getting hurt.  Every spring, young athletes begin intensive training for track season, and within weeks, many are halted by common running injuries such as plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, IT band syndrome, runner’s knee, and shin splints.

Plantar Fasciitis – Since our feet absorb a force several times our body weight with each step, it is not surprising that approximately 15 percent of all running injuries affect the foot.  Plantar fasciitis is caused by straining the ligament that supports the arch, and is usually the top foot complaint among runners.  The pain, which typically feels like a stabbing pain on the bottom of the heel, is usually worse first thing in the morning or after periods of inactivity and can intensify after standing for long periods of time.

What starts out as a fairly easy-to-treat injury, when ignored, can result in an extremely painful condition that can sideline track athletes.  Runners who have very high or very low arches are vulnerable because both foot types cause the plantar fascia to be stretched away from the heel bone.  Other risk factors are extreme pronation (foot rolls inward excessively) and supination (foot rolls outward excessively).

Maintaining good flexibility throughout the inter-connective chain of the lower leg including the ankle, Achilles tendon and calf muscles is the best way to prevent plantar fasciitis for track runners.  Preventative measures for plantar fasciitis are similar to that of treatment so it makes sense for athletes to use preventative measure to avoid the pain.

Medi-Dyne’s 2Steps plantar fasciitis solution recommends:

Orthopedic-Shoe-and-Podiatry-Markets_08Bio-mechanically designed Tuli’s Heel Cup provides immediate relief by cushioning the area of pain and elevating the calcaneus (heel bone) to take pressure off of the Achilles tendon, lessening the tension and allowing for a regaining of flexibility.

The ProStretch Plus has been proven to provide a deep stretch that increases flexibility along the entire inter-connective chain, delivering the long-term flexibility needed for both the prevention and treatment of plantar fasciitis.  Read how to use the ProStretch Plus to prevent plantar fasciitis.

Achilles tendonitis – The Achilles tendon connects the two major calf muscles to the back of the heel. When overused, the tendon tightens and becomes irritated.  Achilles tendinitis is responsible for approximately 11 percent of all running injuries.  Runners who dramatically increase their training at the beginning of track season and who have tight, weak calves are vulnerable to this injury.

Many people suffering from Achilles tendonitis symptoms experience swelling and mild to severe pain in the ankle area.  Achilles tendonitis symptoms typically begin as a mild ache in the back of the leg or above the heel after running or other sports activity.  Pain may come on gradually or may only be felt when running or walking.  Episodes of more severe tendon pain may occur after prolonged running, stair climbing, or sprinting.

Athletes in sports which use a pushing-off motion like track are no strangers to Achilles issues, and calf flexibility is critical to the health of the Achilles tendon.  As with plantar fasciitis, an athlete can prevent and treat Achilles tendonitis by using the ProStretch Plus for a safe and gradual stretch of the lower leg.  Another way to prevent or treat Achilles tendonitis pain is to use shoe inserts like Tuli’s Gaitors and heel cups like Tuli’s Heel Cups.  Both of these items can be placed in a runner’s shoes to promote stability and proper alignment as well as provide long-lasting relief from Achilles tendonitis pain.

cho-pat_achillestendon-500x500A support straps like the Cho-Pat Achilles Tendon Strap can also help alleviate the pain and discomfort of Achilles tendonitis.  Developed in cooperation with the Mayo Clinic, the patented Cho-Pat Achilles Tendon Strap reduces stress on the Achilles tendon by gently lifting the heel, and it can be worn in all shoes or barefoot.

IT Band Syndrome – IT Band Syndrome is the one of the most common overuse injuries for runners. The IT Band lies along the outside of the thigh from the hip to the knee and is designed to assist the hip muscles in the outward movement of the thigh and to stabilize the side of the knee. The knee flexes and extends when running and this can cause the IT Band to rub on the side of the femur. Track athletes who take up their mileage too quickly at the beginning of track season can be susceptible to ITBS.

Runners suffering with ITBS experience pain along the outside of the knee joint, sometimes accompanied by a clicking sensation.  ITBS typically starts with tightness, can become extremely painful on the outside part of the knee or lower thigh, and can be made worse by activity. Runners who do not cross train many suffer from weak hip abductor and gluteal muscles and could be at greater risk for ITBS.  ITBS can be a debilitating injury to a track athlete and can become so painful that a runner is unable to train at all until it heals.

The best way to provide immediate relief for ITBS pain is the Cho-Pat Iliotibial Band Strap.  The Cho-Pat- IT Band Strap compresses the area to begin healing and prevent further damage. This strap delivers Dynamic Pain Diffusion™ to absorb and diffuse stress and provides comfortable support even when running.

For long-term healing and prevention of ITBS, a track athlete needs to stretch and strengthen weak hip and core muscles.  The CoreStretch is an effective tool to stretch and activate the entire interconnected chain of core muscles like hamstrings, lower back, hips, piriformis, and glutes.  Watch how to use the CoreStretch here.  In addition to the CoreStretch, the RangeRoller can be used to deliver a deep tissue massage and increase the blood flow along the full length of the IT Band.  The RangeRoller increases circulation, relieves knots, warms muscles, eliminates scar tissue, and improves an athlete’s overall performance.

Runner's KneeRunner’s Knee – Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) or “runner’s knee” is the irritation of the cartilage on the underside of the patella (kneecap).  Approximately 40 percent of running injuries are knee injuries, and it is a common complaint among track athletes.   Runner’s knee typically flares up during or after long runs, after extended periods of sitting, or while descending hills and stairs.  It is usually starts as a dull pain in the front of the knee and often worsens over time.

Athletes can get immediate relief and support from a couple of Cho-Pat® products.  The Cho-Pat Original Knee Strap stabilizes and tightens the kneecap mechanism and provides track athletes with mobility, comfort, and support.  The Original Knee Strap can be used to reduce pain, improve tracking, and is doctor recommended for over 30 years.  The Cho-Pat Dynamic Knee Compression Sleeve is a light-weight compression sleeve that reinforces the knee, stabilizes, reduces inflammation, and promotes circulation.

For long-term healing and prevention of runner’s knee, a runner should stretch and strengthen glutes, hamstrings and quads.  The patented StretchRite system features a non-elastic strap which makes it easy to perform each stretch properly and effectively.  Watch how to use the StretchRite.

Shin_Splints_PainShin Splints – Shin splints refers to medial tibial stress syndrome, an achy pain that results when small tears occur in the muscles around your shin bone.  Shin splints make up approximately 13 percent of running injuries and results from overuse or an overload of stress. This overload of stress can be due to taking on too much too fast, over-pronation or by calf, foot or Achilles tendon inflexibility.  Athletes who are involved in a sport like track are very likely to experience shin splints pain at some point.

Shin splints sufferers experience pain along or just behind the inner edge of the tibia. The pain typically increases during activity.  It’s important to employ R.I.C.E. (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) and adequate stretching to both reduce pain and remedy shin splints.  For additional immediate relief from existing shin splints pain and added support, a product like Tuli’s Gators will cushion and disperse stress on shin bones.  Tuli’s Gators not only provides good arch support, but it adds light-weight shock absorption to help prevent shin splints pain.

For preventing and treating shin splints, it is important to increase flexibility in calf muscles and feet.  Athletes who stretch their calves daily will increase calf flexibility and dramatically reduce the risk of a muscle imbalance injury like shin splints.  The ProStretch Plus is a very effective tool for stretching and strengthening your calves and increasing lower leg flexibility.

For the runner experiencing shin splints, the Cho-Pat Shin Splint Compression Sleeve is a highly effective tool for alleviating shin splints pain when exercising.  It combines compression and shock absorption to support muscles, stimulate circulation, and maintain warmth to alleviate the pain of shin splints.

 

Top Running Injury No. 9: Weak Knees

Weak KneesThis is the ninth article in a 10-part series exploring some of the most common injuries faced by runners.

If you run a lot, it’s inevitable that your knees will suffer a great deal of wear and tear. Not only does this result in a great deal of discomfort and pain, it can also greatly reduce their strength. Weak knees are a common problem with runners, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy your favorite activity. Medi-Dyne has some information on what causes this condition and how you can manage it.

Causes

There are several reasons why weak knees occur in runners. Here are some of the more common ones:

  • Torn ligaments or cartilage
  • Knee joint infection
  • Arthritis
  • Knee sprains
  • Knee strains

If you experience a burning sensation, redness or swelling and stiffness in the knee, you hear a popping noise when you bend your knee, or you can’t straighten your knee properly, then you should talk to a doctor who can help you determine the right course of treatment.

2Steps to Pain-Free Running

GaitorsGo into your local sports retailer and enter the Medi-Dyne 2Steps Pain Free Zone. You’ll not only find a wealth of information on weak knees and other conditions that commonly affect runners, you’ll also find ways to treat the issue. For example, our Tuli’s® 3/4 Gaitors provide shock absorption that can take pressure off of your knees. Our Tuli’s® Heavy Duty Heel Cups also lessen the impact on your knees while you’re running. To learn more, visit our e-store or give us a call at 800-810-1740.

Top Running Injury No. 8: Runner’s Knee

This is the eighth in a 10-part series outlining some of the most common injuries suffered by runners.

Runner's KneeMost runners, at one time or another, have to deal with some sort of pain and discomfort – this, unfortunately, is the side effect of participating in the activity that you love. One particularly difficult condition is known as runner’s knee. This takes place when the portion of cartilage underneath the kneecap incurs damage. This cartilage acts as a type of shock absorber, and can undergo substantial wear and tear when performing activities such as running and jumping. Medi-Dyne would like to share some information regarding this condition, and the treatments available should you have it.

Causes

Runner’s knee can occur for a variety of reasons. Here are some of the most common.

  • Stress – When the muscles that surround your knees don’t function as they should, that can put additional stress on your kneecap.
  • A Specific Injury – If your kneecap is already injured, due to a problem such as a dislocation or a fracture, that can eventually cause runner’s knee as well.
  • Other Factors – Age, lifestyle and even gender can all play a role in causing the condition.

2Steps to Pain-Free Running

cho-pat_dynamicknee-500x500If you experience any sort of dull pain in the front of your knee that worsens over time, you find it hard to walk up and down stairs without pain, or you feel increasing pain when you squat or kneel, you may have runner’s knee. Fortunately, Medi-Dyne and several sports retailers are working together to provide relief. Find your local Medi-Dyne 2Steps Pain Free Zone and you’ll see products such as the Cho-Pat® Original Knee Strap, which tightens and stabilizes your kneecap so that you can stay in the game. Also, you’ll find the Cho-Pat® Dynamic Knee Compression Sleeve, which reduces pain and also provides warmth and support. Learn more by visiting our e-store or calling 800-810-1740.

How You Can Combat the Effects of Runner’s Knee

Runner's KneeOne of the most common injuries among people who regularly exercise is runner’s knee. This condition occurs in people who hike, bike, jump, or engage in any other type of physical activity that requires constant bending of the knees. Medi-Dyne offers products, as well as advice, that can help you deal with this condition and stay involved in your favorite activity.

Why it Happens

Runner’s knee symptoms include grinding of the knee joint, pain when bending the knee, popping and swelling. The most common reason it occurs is simple overuse of the muscles in the area. We know you love to work out on a regular basis, but it’s extremely important that you take the time to get the proper rest in between. The body can be viewed as a series of inter-connective chains. If you have a foot problem, that can lead to a shin problem. If you have a shin problem, that can lead to knee difficulties. As soon as you feel knee pain you have to stop what you’re doing and see a doctor.

How to Handle Runner’s Knee

If you have runner’s knee, Medi-Dyne has a solution. We offer a knee strap that provides maximum support both above that below the kneecap. It reduces the chances of grinding and popping, and also reduces the risk of displacement. If you are interested in learning more, get in contact with us or check out our Pinterest, Facebook and Twitter pages. We’re ready to help prevent the kinds of problems that can rob you of participating in the activities that you so dearly love.

Knee Pain: Solutions to Prevent Runner’s Knee

Cho-PatKnee pain is one of the most common symptoms of injury that individuals experience during the summer months. People are generally more active than they have been all year, and are using muscles in ways they have not been for several months.

Runner’s Knee is a term used to describe multiple knee pains and injuries, including; patellofemoral pain syndrome, and chondromalacia of the patella, . Runner’s Knee is the most common overuse injury among runner’s and individuals performing physical activity. Sufferers of runner’s knee usually experience pain around the knee or even behind the kneecap. Runner’s often experience runner’s knee after increasing mileage, and pain increases when running up an incline or down hill.

What are the causes of Runner’s Knee?

  • Overuse: Overstretched tendons, repeated jumping or bending of the knee can cause the tendons in the knee to be inflamed.
  • Trauma to the knee: Contact to the knee or a fall can cause runner’s knee pain.
  • Misalignment: A misalignment of the bones or muscles can cause stress to be placed unevenly, causing pain or even misplacement of the kneecap itself.
  • Weak muscles: Weak Glutes or upper leg muscles (Hamstrings, IT bands, Quads) will often pull at the knee causing knee pain. 
  • Arthritis: Arthritis Can cause aching or throbbing knee pain along the ligaments and tendons within the kneecap. 
  • Flat Feet: Stretching of the muscles or tendons can also be caused by overpronation, fallen arches, or flat feet.

What are solutions for Runner’s Knee pain?

  • Rest and Ice:
    Decrease your mileage or take a break from training. Icing can help with areas of inflammation but overall, rest will give your knee time to recover.
  • Support:
    The Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Strap provides maximum support above and below the kneecap. It will eliminate knee pain by reducing the force of the quad muscles on the knee. The Dual Action Knee Strap improves tracking of the kneecap mechanism as well as minimizing the possibility for displacement.

Always keep in mind that your body is an interconnective chain. It is important to address an injury when your first experience it, to prevent it from affecting other areas of your body. Find your solution to prevent further injuries!

Until next time follow Medi-Dyne on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for healthy tips and special offers!

Always,

Lauren

Knee Pain : Are you experiencing Runner’s Knee?

The Issue

Runner’s Knee is an injury that can be endured in many different ways. An athlete that continually is bending their knee such as hiking, biking, jumping, and any warring physical activity can be susceptible to experiencing runner’s knee pain. The symptoms of Runner’s Knee are swelling, popping of knee, grinding of knee joints, pain behind or around the kneecap, and pain when bending the knee. The body is an interconnective chain, it is imperative to seek proper medical attention if you are injured. You do not want to end up letting the injury migrate and affect other areas of your body.

The Cause

Runner’s Knee can be attributed to many underlying issues. The most common result of experiencing runner’s knee pain is the over use of the muscles. It is essential for individuals performing physical activity to allow themselves the proper rest, to allow their body to rebuild. The body is an interconnective chain as we have discussed before. Runner’s Knee can be a direct result of fallen arches, overpronation, and weak thighs. If you are feeling pain it is imperative to take action immediately to find a pain preventative solution, before the problem migrates to another area of the body. Being an athlete myself, it is important to take care of your body. I continually listen to how my body is feeling so I can avoid injury. It is better to take a day off to allow the body to rest and recuperate, than to be out for a week because you “over did it.”

The Solution

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms you should first consult your physician to get a proper diagnosis. A solution that I have found that works for me is the Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Strap.

It provides maximum support above and below the kneecap. It reduces the force of quad muscles on the knee, and lessens the potential for popping and grinding attributed to misalignment. Below the knee it will improve tracking of the kneecap mechanism, and reduce the possibility for displacement. It is imperative to seek out a solution to prevent Runner’s Knee. Being an athlete is a way of life. Any interruption to training causes an imbalance to everyday life. Get the proper diagnosis and find a solution to get you back to your maximum performance level.

Remember to listen to your body during training. If you are experiencing an issue allow your body time to recuperate. It is important to stretch and strengthen your muscles, because the body is an interconnective chain. An athlete experiences a lot of wear and tear to the body, so take action to stay healthy and injury free!

Until next time follow Medi-Dyne on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for healthy tips and special offers!

Always,

Lauren

#Runchat with David Hylton

#Runchat is an online Q&A Forum that allows runners from all walks of life to connect and share their trials and tribulations.

Early this week Craig and I got the opportunity to speak with David about his personal journey and how he and Scott linked up to create #Runchat.

#Runchat was started about three years ago when David and Scott came into contact through an online forum that was centered solely on fitness. At that time in the online world there was no sole place just centered on running. They decided to put their social media expertise together and create #runchat; a community where runners could go for nearly every question they have.

Medi-Dyne: What was your background in before you started runchat?

David: My background has always been in Communications and Business. I worked in the newspaper industry for 7 years; every job that I have had in my career I have dabbled in social media. I started blogging about running 2007 at runningbecauseican.com.  I joined the twitter sphere in 2008. In some aspect I have always been linked in online and it is something that I thoroughly enjoy taking part in.

Medi-Dyne: When did you and Scott launch #runchat?

David: We launched #runchat in June of 2010. We originally kicked it off to be on Thursday nights. Thursdays were more social than anything and many people were not at home during the hour the forum was live. We took a survey and nearly every runner voted for Sunday night. We were sold; Sunday nights at 8 P.M. EST you can get all your running questions answered!

Medi-Dyne: What is the most rewarding thing to you with the success of #runchat?

David: What I find most rewarding is that Scott and I created a platform for runners to connect in a positive community. We see runners of all levels asking and answering questions. We have created a community where people are able to connect and help each other on their journeys and share the same experiences.

Medi-Dyne: What is something that many people do not know about you?

David: Most people do not know that Scott and I have been working together for 3 years; however in October was the first time we had met in person.

Medi-Dyne: In the future where do you see #runchat?

David: We would like to reach a larger audience with #runchat. We want to provide the forum to people who aren’t linked in yet, and give them that access to a positive running community where they can share their experiences.

Thank you David for taking the time to speak with Craig and I. We wish you, Scott, and #Runchat the best in the future. Check out #Runchat this Sunday at 8 P.M. EST to have all your running questions answered.

Also you can enter to win a Cho-Pat Shin Splints Compression Sleeve or a Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Strap at #Runchat!

The Cho-Pat Shin Splints Compression Sleeve eliminates the symptoms of pain and discomfort that come with Shin Splints.

    • Provides Compression Forces while Supporting the Lower Leg Muscles and Soft Tissues.
    • Stimulates Circulation
    • Maintains Warmth

The Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Strap is an effective solution for Runner’s Knee, Jumper’s Knee, Misalignment of Quadriceps, and Patellar Tendonitis.

    • Provides Full Mobility
    • Improves Tracking and Reduces Displacement.
    • Lessens the potential for misalignment.
    • Reduces the force of quad muscles on the knee.

Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products is focused on providing innovative and highly effective Pain Prevention Products. Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products family of brands includes Cho-Pat, Tuli’s, StretchRite, RangeRoller, ProStretch, CoreStretch, Soft Moves, Skin-On-Skin, and the ProStretch Plus.

Until next time follow Medi-Dyne on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for healthy tips and special offers.

Always,

Lauren

Tools that are Essential for Long Distance Runners!

Howdy, hope everyone is off to a great week !

The Medi-Dyne Team had the opportunity to connect with Skye Donovan while at the APTA show in San Diego. Skye is an Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at Marymount University, Orthopedic Certified Specialist, has a B.S. from Ursinus College, M.P.T. from Texas Woman’s University, a Ph.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, as well as a Marathon Coach for Team In Training in Arlington, VA. She is also affiliated with the Rogue Racers! If you are in the area, I would highly recommend getting in contact with Skye if seeking additional information about Physical Therapy or needing advice on preparing for your running adventure! We loved getting to know Skye; she shared information about how to properly train for a marathon; in turn we wanted to share with her the positive benefits of our Pain Prevention Products and how they can benefit the people that she works with everyday!

Skye uses the RangeRoller and StretchRite, both versatile products that are great for long distance runners and patients in PT. Both of these products are great to treat tight muscles and soreness after long runs.

Medi-Dyne: Skye what drew you towards Medi-Dyne products?

Skye: I was not familiar with Medi-Dyne Healthcare Products before the APTA CSM conference in San Diego. I was drawn into the booth by the unique design of your products. I also was very fond of the fact that your products were travels sized and would easily fit in any bag I use while working, and training.

Medi-Dyne: Skye what is your favorite thing about the RangeRoller?

Skye: I especially like the additional Trigger Treads on the RangeRoller; they add areas of increased pressure to tired and sore muscles that the other roller products on the market leave out. I am better equipped to work on trigger points with this design.

Medi-Dyne: What did you find unique about the StretchRite?

Skye: The StretchRite has the nice feature of the grip handles, which on cold days (we train outdoors in all seasons) help save raw hands from chaffing that often occurs with other stretch straps.

Medi-Dyne: Would you recommend Medi-Dyne products to your patients and runners you train?

Skye: I would recommend these products to athletes, I think one of the best features is the size of the products; they can easily fit into suitcases and carry-on bags for athletes who travel. Often time’s athletes travel long distances for endurance events and it is important to be able to keep up their routine both before and after the event.  I have had great success working on quadriceps, hamstrings and ITB tightness with the Range Roller; it has eliminated my need for the foam roller.

The Medi-Dyne team would like to thank Skye for stopping by our booth and letting us get to know her a little better! If you are in Arlington, VA and looking for a PT or training coach I would highly recommend Skye.  She is full of knowledge and has a passion for her work!

Until next time follow Medi-Dyne on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for healthy tips and special offers!

Always,

Lauren

Welcome to the Medi-Dyne Family Cho-Pat

Cho-Pat, a Welcome Addition

At Medi-Dyne we’re excited to be able to offer you a comprehensive selection of pain relief and prevention solutions that deliver relief, support, and performance improvement for the entire length of your body’s interconnective chain of muscles, joints, tendons, and ligaments.

MD-Family

We look forward to providing you with innovative, easy-to-use solutions that really work! For more information visit www.medi-dyne.com, or connect with us @MediDyne.

Join Medi-Dyne in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

OctBreastCancer_promo_sm